11th Annual William C. Canby Jr. Lecture – Struggles in Federal Indian Law: Alaska Native Rights and the Katie John Litigation – 1/26


Thursday, January 26 • 4-6 p.m.
Beus Center for Law and Society
W. P. Carey Armstrong Foundation Great Hall
111 E. Taylor Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004

The 11th Annual William C. Canby Jr. Lecture will feature guest lecturer Professor Robert T. Anderson will review the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and focus on the Katie John litigation over the right to fish at a traditional village and fish camp site by upper Ahtna people.

Anderson is a Professor and Director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington School Of Law, and is the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School where he teaches annually.

This may qualify for 1.0 general CLE credit.

Free and open to the public. Food will be reserved to those who RSVP at law.asu.edu/canby. We hope to see you there.

Download and print pdf: 2018 Canby Anderson Flyer_CLE

Prof. Ferguson-Bohnee talks about Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE Conference

ASU Law Indian Legal Program Cultures Under Water December 6-8, 2017 from SandraDayOConnorCollegeofLaw on Vimeo.

Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE Conference 

Dec. 6: Before the Flood film / Pima Theater / 6 – 7:45 pm / Free & open to public.
Dec 7: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 8 am – 5 pm / Walk-in Registration opens at 7:30 am.
Fairly Traceable play / Pima Theater / 6:15 – 7:45 pm / Free & open to public. This play qualifies for free 1.5 CLE credit hours.
Dec. 8: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 7:30 am – 5 pm

#climateimpacts #climatechangeisnotamyth #weareallclimatekeepers#culturalheritageisahumanright

Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage – Standard Registration ends TODAY!


Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE Conference will be held Wednesday, December 6 – Friday, December 8, 2017 at the Memorial Union on Tempe campus.

Extreme weather and climate events have increased over the past 50 years and Indigenous peoples are among the most vulnerable to the adverse effects because they are often inextricably tied to their land. As a result, climate change not only threatens the landscape, but also cultural identity.  Indigenous peoples have used traditional knowledge to mitigate climate disruptions and to adapt to the changing environment. However, policy discussions have failed to adequately address climate impacts on cultural heritage, and the rapid rate of climate disruptions continues to threaten indigenous cultures and communities with alarming speed. This conference will build on the discussions of climate change, adaptation, and traditional knowledge by focusing specifically on climate impacts on tribal cultural heritage.

We will bring together tribal leadership and members, scientists, scholars, attorneys and activists to discuss climate change threats and challenges faced by indigenous communities.  The goal is to share knowledge and resources with tribal representatives to respond to threats to cultural heritage by addressing:  Is cultural heritage a human right, and why is tribal cultural heritage important?  How does climate change impact tribal cultural heritage? How can tribal communities maintain cultural heritage in the face of changing climate risks?  Attendees will participate in sessions that focus on identifying obstacles and proposing solutions to these challenges.

Dec. 6: Before the Flood film
Dec 7: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 6-7:30 pm
       Fairly Traceable play / Pima Theater / 6:15-7:45 pm
Dec. 8: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 7:30 am-5 pm

Learn more at: law.asu.edu/climateimpacts

Download updated PDF flyer – Climate Impacts 110117

Questions? Contact Jennifer Williams at jennifer.h.williams@asu.edu or 480-727-0420.

Proff. Clinton in Cronkite News – Supreme Court won’t hear Arizona case on custody fight over tribal kids

Professor Robert N. Clinton in Cronkite News “The case falls within the coverage of the act and that’s exactly what the Goldwater Institute objects to … the act itself,” Clinton said Tuesday. “They’re trying to overturn an act of Congress that goes back 40 years … and has weathered every constitutional challenge that has been voiced against it.”

Read full article: Supreme Court won’t hear Arizona case on custody fight over tribal kids