“Cultural Misappropriation” – Professor Reed 3/31

Professor Trevor Reed is giving a presentation on Wednesday, March 31 at 5:30-7:30pm EST for Intellectual Property Law Association on “Cultural Misappropriation.”

Register for free to join.

About the program: What is cultural misappropriation and why does it matter? Tune in for a conversation between legal experts and activists covering Copyright and Trademark issues of cultural misappropriation such as the Washington pro football team (Harjo v. Pro Football and its relationship with Matal v. Tam), fashion (Urban Outfitters v. Navajo), photography and music on reservations, and traditional knowledge labeling

Job Opportunity – General Attorney

General Attorney – Full-Time
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Customs and Border Protection
Office of Chief Counsel

Open & Closing dates:
02/17/2021 to 03/02/2021

Locations: 2 vacancies in Glynco, GA

Summary:
As our nation navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, CBP is committed to delivering our mission to safeguard America’s borders and enable legitimate trade and travel. Staffing mission critical positions remains a high priority. Be reassured that CBP is still hiring, despite potential hiring process step delays due to restrictions to in-person activities.

Requirements:
• You must be a U.S. Citizen to apply for this position
• Males born after 12/31/1959 must be registered with Selective Service
• Primary U.S. residency for at least three of the last five years (additional details below)
• You may be required to pass a background investigation
• CBP follows the DHS Drug-Free Workplace Plan for drug testing procedures
• As an employee of CBP, you will be joining a workforce that is dedicated to accomplishing our mission while maintaining the trust of our Nation by strictly adhering to all government ethics standards.

See full job announcement and application details:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/592501200

Agency Contact Information:
Phone: 952-857-2932

Job Opportunity – General Attorney

General Attorney – Full-Time
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Customs and Border Protection
Office of Chief Counsel

Open & Closing Dates:
02/18/2021 to 03/03/2021

Locations: 1 vacancy in Los Angeles, CA

Summary:
As our nation navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, CBP is committed to delivering our mission to safeguard America’s borders and enable legitimate trade and travel. Staffing mission critical positions remains a high priority. Be reassured that CBP is still hiring, despite potential hiring process step delays due to restrictions to in-person activities.

Requirements:
• You must be a U.S. Citizen to apply for this position
• Males born after 12/31/1959 must be registered with Selective Service
• Primary U.S. residency for at least three of the last five years (additional details below)
• You may be required to pass a background investigation
• CBP follows the DHS Drug-Free Workplace Plan for drug testing procedures
• As an employee of CBP, you will be joining a workforce that is dedicated to accomplishing our mission while maintaining the trust of our Nation by strictly adhering to all government ethics standards.

See full job announcement and application details:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/592628700

For further information please contact:
Shelby Stuntz
Phone: (562) 980-3141

Progress, Power, Purpose: Stacy Leeds

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on Native women legal professionals and their Progress, Power, Purpose. Newest to the ILP Family, Indian law scholar Stacy Leeds brings her extraordinary experiences and ideas to shape the futures. Having paved the way for Native women in different areas, why not consult with this fierce Oklahoma Cherokee woman? Amid a global crisis, this visionary created her blog—IndigenousWell—as a platform to propel Indigenous women in the field the much-needed inclusion and balance work of health and wellness.

Q: What does your current position entail?
A: Teaching, writing, helping to advance the mission of the Law School and the ILP

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work?
A: Indian law has always been an interest, but I never would have predicted the many directions my work would take

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area?
A: Always be respectful and supportive of others. Never underestimate the value in your reputation and your network.

Q: What is your proudest career moment?
A: It’s the many moments when former students exceed their own expectations. It is very powerful to witness a big change in someone’s life trajectory and know you played an important role in that.

Q: Is there anything you’ve learned after graduating law school that you wished you learned in class?
A: The complexity of what it takes to be a really great advocate. The strategy, the big picture, the importance of knowing when to be bold and when to be reserved. Law school is a great start, but there are many things that come with experience and maturity.

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career?
A: Critical thinking skills coupled with the ability to communicate. It’s why law school graduates will always have the benefit of diverse career opportunities.

Q: Who are three Native American women law professionals and/or advocates who should be on our radar right now?

Q: You are a Native American woman making history and have been the “first” in prominent areas throughout your career—first Native American woman to serve as a Law School dean, first woman justice for the Cherokee Nation’s Supreme Court—Did you ever feel like the lone Native American voice in the room? How did you overcome those adversities? For that girl/woman who is finding her rhythm and trying to carve out a space to thrive, what advice would you give her?
A: I have often been the only woman and the only Native American voice on certain issues and inside certain physical spaces, but I have rarely felt “alone” in those moments. There’s a big difference in feeling lonely (wishing you had peers around you) and being alone (separated without a connection to others). I am always connected to Indigenous issues and Indigenous people and those connections strengthen me. That being said, many of us will find ourselves in roles and circumstances where we are the perceived “voice” representing others. It’s a delicate balance to maximize the power and duty in that moment while simultaneously educating others on the diversity of viewpoints across Indian country. At the end of the day, always try to be your authentic self and don’t compromise your values. There will always be hard days and difficult situations, but in totality, look for opportunities where the positive energy far exceeds the negative energy. I have learned that when I prioritize my own mental, physical and spiritual health, I am also at the top of my game professionally, including being a better advocate for others.

Review Stacy’s publications:

  • Two draft co-authored articles published in the SSRN, “A Wealth of Sovereign Choices: Tax Implications of McGirt v. Oklahoma and the Promise of Tribal Economic Development” and “A Familiar Crossroads: McGirt v. Oklahoma and the Future of the Federal Indian Law Canon.” Please email any feedback.
  • Creative Native podcast about the launch of IndigenousWell and how athletics in native youth can positively impact their professional lives as leaders. 

Stay tuned for our next Progress, Power, Purpose series.

________

Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

In Memory of Claudette White (’05)

We mourn the loss of Judge Claudette White, ASU Law class of 2005. Judge White served as a judge for many tribal communities and was recently elected to serve as a council member for the Quechan Tribe. Claudette was a popular figure in Indian Country due to her quick wit, warm smile and dedication to Indian law and justice. She gained deserved notoriety after being featured in the 2017 PBS film documentary “Tribal Justice.” The documentary featured Judge White and another tribal judge as they worked to use traditional concepts of justice to reduce incarceration and improve community safety. Claudette was always finding ways to give back, and we appreciate her efforts to present at ILP events, speak to students, and assist with tribal court trainings.

Most recently, Claudette performed with the Quechan Lightening Singers to open the inauguration events of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris where she was able to personally congratulate them for their win and said she “would also like to thank both of them for their commitment to upholding the U.S. trust responsibility to tribal nations and our sacred lands, with the promise to restore lands, and protect the natural cultural resources within them.”

Claudette’s kindness, laughter, and friendship will be missed by all. Read more on Claudette’s legacy in Indian Country Today’s article.

Our deepest condolences go out to her son, Zion, and her family and friends.

If you’d like to send funds to support her medical and funeral expenses, go here.

Job Opportunity – Full Time Attorney

Arizona Voice for Crime Victims (AVCV)

Summary: The legal representation will be limited to asserting and enforcing victims’ constitutional and/or statutory rights in criminal proceedings.

Requirements:

  • J.D. from an accredited law school
  • Membership in good standing with the State Bar of Arizona and the District of Arizona
  • Having reliable transportation and being able to travel throughout Arizona frequently, occasional out of state travel
  • Passing a background check
  • Being able to obtain a fingerprint card

Qualifications: Ideal candidate will have in-depth knowledge of the Federal Crime Victims’ Rights Act and the Arizona Victims’ Bill of Rights

  • Experience working with members of tribes
  • Experience in the state and federal criminal justice system
  • Excellent research, writing, and oral argument skills
  • Ability to  handle a heavy case load
  • Excellent communication and organizational skills

Duties:

  • Appearing in court with victims
  • Conducting research on victims’ right issues
  • Drafting legal pleadings
  • Working with social workers/victim advocates to assist victims throughout the criminal justice process  
  • Assisting with office coverage

Interested applicants should send a cover letter, resume, references, and writing sample to colleen.avcv@gmail.com

2021 ILP Alumni Awards – Call for Nominations

The ILP alumni awards are now open. Nominate your classmates and friends! The ILP Awards include Professional Achievement, Alumni Service Award, and Emerging Leader Award. Nominations are due March 5, 2021! Nomination materials should be sent by email to: Kate.Rosier@asu.edu. Awards will be presented at the ILP Alumni & Friends Virtual Awards Ceremony. Details for date, time and location will be shared soon.

Nomination Guidelines

ILP Professional Achievement Award – This award recognizes outstanding achievement in Indian Law or Tribal Law throughout an individual’s career. The award honors ILP alumni whose achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law have brought distinction to themselves and real benefit to the Indian community. Nomination Package Requirements:

  • Describe the unique professional achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law that has brought distinction to the candidate. (maximum two pages)
  • Describe the recognized contributions made by this candidate that demonstrate a benefit to the larger community. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways in which the candidate’s achievements are truly extraordinary or exceptional. (maximum one page)
  • Provide at least two letters of support from individuals that can speak to the candidate’s impact on his or her profession.
  • Letters of support should speak to the magnitude of the individual’s impact in the practice of Indian or tribal law or in the Indian community.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Kathy Bowman (’86), Rob Rosette (’96), Diane Enos (’92), Ben Hanley (’71), Herb Yazzie (’75).

ILP Alumni Service Award – This award is given for outstanding service to the Indian Legal Program, and is awarded for extended, extraordinary service to the Indian Legal Program. Nomination Package Requirements

  • Describe the ways in which the candidate has served or supported the ILP and the ILP alumni. Examples can include serving on committees, boards, CLEs, mentoring ILP students, or other volunteer or fundraising efforts or funding commitments. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways this service been truly extraordinary. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has benefited the ILP. (maximum one page)
  • Please provide at least two letters of support from ILP alumni as part of the nomination package.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Verrin Kewenvoyouma (’04), Ann Marie Downes (’94), Mary Shirley (’92) and Jeff Harmon (’05)

ILP Emerging Leader Award – This award acknowledges and encourages service to Indian Country and the ILP by alumni who are less than ten years out of law school. The award recognizes outstanding achievements in their professional career, volunteer work, and promotion or support of the ILP and/or ASU NALSA. Nomination Package Requirements.

  • Describe how the candidate has achieved professional success in their legal career.
  • Describe the candidate’s volunteer work.
  • Describe how the candidate achieved an exceptional level of service while balancing the demands of being a recent graduate. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate was proactive in efforts to become involved in ILP and/or ILP alumni activities. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has been sustained over a long period of time or how the service has been innovative or beneficial. (maximum one page)
  • Provide two letters of support from fellow ILP alumni.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle (’09), Nikki Borchardt Campbell (’09), Steve Bodmer (’06), Elizabeth Medicine Crow (’05), Charles Galbraith (’07), Matthew Campbell (’08) and Michael Corey Hinton (’11)

Job Opportunity – General Attorney

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY – Customs and Border Protection – Office of Chief Counsel

Salary: $65,190.00 – $142,732.00

Closing date: 2/11/2021

Position Summary:

As our nation navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, CBP is committed to delivering our mission to safeguard America’s borders and enable legitimate trade and travel. Staffing mission critical positions remains a high priority. Be reassured that CBP is still hiring, despite potential hiring process step delays due to restrictions to in-person activities.

Qualifications:

  • Applicant must be a graduate from a full course of study in a School of Law accredited by the American Bar Association and be an active member in good standing of the bar of a state, territory of the United States, the District of Columbia or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
  • Specialized Education: Recent law school graduates may be appointed to attorney positions at the GS-11 level with the following additional qualifications: rank in the top 1/3 of graduating class; participation on the school’s official Law Review; membership in the Order of the Coif; or winning of a moot court competition.
  • An interim appointment of 14 months may be made pending the selectee’s admission to the bar.
  • Selectee will be required to provide admittance and standing to the Bar and must provide a copy of their official law school transcript.
  • Experience refers to paid and unpaid experience, including volunteer work done through National Service programs (e.g., Peace Corps, AmeriCorps) and other organizations (e.g., professional; philanthropic; religious; spiritual; community, student, social).

 Responsibilities:

  • Providing legal advice to, and legal representation of, Customs and Border Protection (CBP’s) National Finance Center, Revenue Division, Procurement Division, Facilities Management & Engineering Division, Environmental and Energy Division (Office of Enterprise Services), Office of Trade, Office of Field Operations, and other CBP offices throughout the United States;
  • Performing legal research into laws, regulations, decisions and other precedents bearing on legal issues involving CBP, particularly in the areas of federal appropriations, bankruptcy, collections (primarily customs duties, liquidated damages, fees and charges), contract, construction, employment, environmental, international trade, real property and tort law;
  • Assisting the Department of Justice in civil action involving CBP by preparing litigation reports, affidavits, and other pleading, and participating in discovery, motion drafting, settlement discussions, and providing litigation support in a variety of matters such as complex trade cases generally involving the collection of revenue, actions brought under federal statutes such as the False Claims Act, procurement disputes filed in federal courts, and condemnation actions; and also representing CBP in various third party administrative hearings involving matters such as employee discipline and adverse actions, arbitrations, EEO discrimination complaints, Merit Systems Principles Board (MSPB) appeals, contract and travel/relocation disputes before the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, and employee overpayment hearings; and
  • Advocating for claims filed on behalf of the Government and provides legal opinions and advice concerning resolution of claims against the government arising out of CBP operations.
  • Travel Required Occasional travel – You may be expected to travel for this position.

See full job announcement and application details: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/590767100

Job Opportunity – Staff Attorney

Four Rivers Indian Legal Services,
a division of Southern Arizona Legal Aid, Inc.
Sacaton, AZ

Closing date: Open until filled

The person to be hired will undertake legal representation for members of the Gila
River Indian Community (GRIC) in civil actions involving family law matters,
consumer cases, housing, benefits, wills, and estate administration. Practice will
primarily be before the Gila River Indian Community Court with additional work in
the Pinal and Maricopa Superior Court systems.

Minimum Requirements:

  1. Applicants must be members of the Arizona State Bar or pass the next exam; applicants licensed two years in another jurisdiction may practice by special rule. In addition, a successful candidate should either be admitted to practice before the Gila River Community Court or be willing to apply for and be admitted to practice at GRIC within three months of hire.
  2. Preferred candidates should have advocacy experience before
    administrative tribunals or governmental agencies; education or experience
    in Indian law and policy highly preferred.
  3. Applicants must exhibit a high degree of sensitivity to the legal issues faced
    by low-income, rural, and Native populations. They should have initiative,
    excellent communication skills, and the ability to work well in a multi-cultural
    setting.
  4. Ability to speak the O’otham language and familiarity with O’otham and
    Piipaash culture helpful. Bilingual English/Spanish also helpful.

See full job description: 2021 Sacaton Attorney

Cover letter, resume and three references to salahr@sazlegalaid.org

Contact:
Hiring Committee
Southern Arizona Legal Aid Inc.
2343 E. Broadway Blvd., Suite 200
Tucson, Arizona 85719-6007

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