11th Annual William C. Canby Jr. Lecture – Struggles in Federal Indian Law: Alaska Native Rights and the Katie John Litigation – 1/26


Thursday, January 26 • 4-6 p.m.
Beus Center for Law and Society
W. P. Carey Armstrong Foundation Great Hall
111 E. Taylor Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004

The 11th Annual William C. Canby Jr. Lecture will feature guest lecturer Professor Robert T. Anderson will review the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and focus on the Katie John litigation over the right to fish at a traditional village and fish camp site by upper Ahtna people.

Anderson is a Professor and Director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington School Of Law, and is the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School where he teaches annually.

This may qualify for 1.0 general CLE credit.

Free and open to the public. Food will be reserved to those who RSVP at law.asu.edu/canby. We hope to see you there.

Download and print pdf: 2018 Canby Anderson Flyer_CLE

Prof. Ferguson-Bohnee talks about Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE Conference

ASU Law Indian Legal Program Cultures Under Water December 6-8, 2017 from SandraDayOConnorCollegeofLaw on Vimeo.

Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE Conference 

Dec. 6: Before the Flood film / Pima Theater / 6 – 7:45 pm / Free & open to public.
Dec 7: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 8 am – 5 pm / Walk-in Registration opens at 7:30 am.
Fairly Traceable play / Pima Theater / 6:15 – 7:45 pm / Free & open to public. This play qualifies for free 1.5 CLE credit hours.
Dec. 8: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 7:30 am – 5 pm

#climateimpacts #climatechangeisnotamyth #weareallclimatekeepers#culturalheritageisahumanright

Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage – Standard Registration ends TODAY!


Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE Conference will be held Wednesday, December 6 – Friday, December 8, 2017 at the Memorial Union on Tempe campus.

Extreme weather and climate events have increased over the past 50 years and Indigenous peoples are among the most vulnerable to the adverse effects because they are often inextricably tied to their land. As a result, climate change not only threatens the landscape, but also cultural identity.  Indigenous peoples have used traditional knowledge to mitigate climate disruptions and to adapt to the changing environment. However, policy discussions have failed to adequately address climate impacts on cultural heritage, and the rapid rate of climate disruptions continues to threaten indigenous cultures and communities with alarming speed. This conference will build on the discussions of climate change, adaptation, and traditional knowledge by focusing specifically on climate impacts on tribal cultural heritage.

We will bring together tribal leadership and members, scientists, scholars, attorneys and activists to discuss climate change threats and challenges faced by indigenous communities.  The goal is to share knowledge and resources with tribal representatives to respond to threats to cultural heritage by addressing:  Is cultural heritage a human right, and why is tribal cultural heritage important?  How does climate change impact tribal cultural heritage? How can tribal communities maintain cultural heritage in the face of changing climate risks?  Attendees will participate in sessions that focus on identifying obstacles and proposing solutions to these challenges.

Dec. 6: Before the Flood film
Dec 7: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 6-7:30 pm
       Fairly Traceable play / Pima Theater / 6:15-7:45 pm
Dec. 8: Conference / Ventana Ballroom / 7:30 am-5 pm

Learn more at: law.asu.edu/climateimpacts

Download updated PDF flyer – Climate Impacts 110117

Questions? Contact Jennifer Williams at jennifer.h.williams@asu.edu or 480-727-0420.

Proff. Clinton in Cronkite News – Supreme Court won’t hear Arizona case on custody fight over tribal kids

Professor Robert N. Clinton in Cronkite News “The case falls within the coverage of the act and that’s exactly what the Goldwater Institute objects to … the act itself,” Clinton said Tuesday. “They’re trying to overturn an act of Congress that goes back 40 years … and has weathered every constitutional challenge that has been voiced against it.”

Read full article: Supreme Court won’t hear Arizona case on custody fight over tribal kids

Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage – Attorney CLE Early Bird Registration ends TODAY!

Cultures Under Water: Climate Impacts on Tribal Cultural Heritage CLE conference will be held Wednesday, December 6* – Friday, December 8, 2017 at the Memorial Union, Ventana Ballroom on ASU Tempe campus.

*Note: December 6 is evening only and will feature Before The Flood by Fisher Stevens. This film features Leonardo DiCaprio with contributions by many scientists and researchers from around the world, who meet and discuss the reality of climate change in various locations on five continents as they witness climate change firsthand.

On the evening of December 7, there will be a staged reading of nationally acclaimed playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle ’s play, Fairly Traceable. This play tells the story of two young attorneys – one a citizen of the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, the other a citizen of the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe in southern Louisiana – who are both fighting to save their Tribal Nations and families from climate change.  Click here to read reviews.

Registration at: law.asu.edu/climateimpacts

Download updated PDF flyer – Climate Impacts 102617

Questions? Contact Jennifer Williams at jennifer.h.williams@asu.edu or 480-727-0420.

Standing Rock Documentary – 11/13 & 11/14


The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture Series on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community is featuring Myron Dewey, a Standing Rock drone pilot who has made a documentary of his footage, titled Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock. The documentary will be screened on November 13 at Sun Devil Market Place, 660 S College Ave, Tempe, and on November 14 in Steel Auditorium, Heard Museum, 2301 N Central Ave, Phoenix.  The events begin at both sites with a reception followed by a screening of the documentary and a question and answer session.

Click here for press release about Myron and his documentary:

Standing Rock activist, filmmaker to speak at ASU indigenous series events

Myron Dewey (Newe-Numah/Paiute-Shoshone), a filmmaker, citizen journalist and educator is the featured speaker in ASU’s Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community for fall 2017.

With Josh Fox and James Spione, Dewey co-directed the documentary film “Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock,” which chronicles the #NoDAPL peaceful protests on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.

ASU will host two screenings of “Awake”: the first on Monday, November 13 at Sun Devil Marketplace, 660 South College Avenue in Tempe and the second on Tuesday, November 14 at the Heard Museum, 2301 North Central Avenue in Phoenix. Both events begin with a reception at 6 p.m. followed by the film at 6:45 p.m. Dewey will be present for a Q & A after the screenings, which are free of charge and open to the public.

Dewey is from the Walker River Paiute Tribe, Agui Diccutta Band (Trout Eaters) on his father’s side and Bishop Paiute Tribe on his mother’s side. He holds AA and BS degrees from Haskell Indian Nations University and an MA from the University of Kansas. He is founder and owner of Digital Smoke Signals, a social media and film company.

Committed to what he calls “indigenizing media,” Dewey works to bridge the digital divide between mainstream media and native communities. He is an expert drone operator, youth media trainer, and language preservation app builder.

Henry Quintero, faculty advisor for Red Ink journal and an assistant professor of English in Indigenous Literature at ASU, believes Dewey is succeeding at this, primarily because Dewey’s work exists outside traditional confines of space and place. He “has transformed and Indigenized American journalism,” he said.

Premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2017, “Awake” has been called “powerful” by the Hollywood Reporter and “an evocative wake-up call told as a visual poem” by IndieWire. The film does not follow a single protagonist but instead forms a “pastiche” of narrative, mostly indigenous, voices. Myron Dewey’s drone footage adds both immediacy and perspective to the film, making him “one of the most closely followed journalists to come out of the movement” (IndieWire). For Dewey’s work, “Awake” won the Special Founders Prize for Citizen Journalism at the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival—a festival founded by legendary documentarian Michael Moore.

“Standing Rock and its opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline is one of the most significant events that has occurred in recent history in Indian Country,” said James Riding In, associate professor and interim director of American Indian Studies at ASU. “Myron Dewey’s film footage shot mostly from his drones represents an important development in journalism and the coverage of real-time events. His film is a testament to Indigenous resistance to abuses committed against people and the environment.”

The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community at Arizona State University addresses topics and issues across disciplines in the arts, humanities, sciences, and politics. Underscoring indigenous American experiences and perspectives, this series seeks to create and celebrate knowledge that evolves from an inclusive indigenous worldview and that is applicable to all walks of life.

ASU sponsors include the American Indian Studies Program, ASU Library, Department of English, Labriola National American Indian Data Center, Office of American Indian Initiatives, and Red Ink Initiative. The Heard Museum is a community partner.

For more information, visit the series website.