Pipeline to Law Online Sessions – First Ever

The Indian Legal Program (“ILP”) and our partner schools University of California, Berkeley School of Law’s Admissions Office, and Michigan State University College of Law’s Indigenous Law and Policy Center joined with the Pre-Law Summer Institute, and Testmasters to put on the 7th Annual Native American Pathway to law program.

The Native American Pathway to Law Initiative Pre-Law Workshops was created in response to the National Native American Bar Association’s 2015 survey, “The Pursuit of Inclusion: An In-Depth Exploration of the Experiences and Perspectives of Native American Attorneys in the Legal Profession.” The survey identified several obstacles Native students face when applying to law school and the Pathway program helps to try solve some of those problems through pre-law advising, testing assistance and mentorship. NNABA help us secure the original funding for the Pathway program and funds to support students with LSAT prep courses. 

The Pathway to Law program is very unique because the staff from three law schools work together, in a non-recruitment environment, to help students create stronger applications and select the best schools for them. The national team of admissions professionals lead the participants through sessions on the admissions timeline, personal statements, school selection, LSAT preparation, and financial aid. The students experienced a mock class taught by Professor Matthew Fletcher from MSU Law, and students were were provided the opportunity to interact with several law school deans. The team also facilitated a student panel and an attorney panel so pipeline participants could ask questions learn about different areas of the profession. 

This year’s program was held virtually over the course of 6 weeks via Zoom and supported by the Slack application. 37 students from 23 tribes and 17 states participated in our virtual program. These students’ age range from 21 to 59 and there were 29 women and 11 men. 

When asked why ASU ILP would help students get admitted to law schools other than ASU, Kate Rosier stated, “The ILP wants to support ALL Native students no matter where they decide to go to law school. The legal profession needs more Native American attorneys and the ILP wants to help make that happen. Some students may need to be close to home or have different dream schools. We are just happy to support them on their journey and hope they do great things for Indian Country.” 

If you would like to support this program, please consider a gift to the ILP c/o the Pipeline to Law program. Your gifts help purchase LSAT prep courses for students that range from $500 – $1,500 and allow us to put on more programs. Make your gift here.

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ILP & NALSA Virtual Graduation Ceremony – Today!

The ILP would like to invite the #ILPFamily to join us in celebrating the graduation of this year’s ILP students. Our virtual ceremony will be broadcast live via YouTube Premiere on  May 13 at 1:30 p.m. (MST) 

If you are unable to join us at that time, you may watch the video at a later time on the premiere page.

Set your reminders, post your congratulatory messages, live chat and tune in to watch our students graduate! 

Tune in at: law.asu.edu/ilpgrad2020

Job Opportunity – Practicing Attorney & 3Ls

Job Description: The Gallup Office of the New Mexico Law Office of the Public Defender is hiring both practicing attorneys and 3Ls interested in a career in indigent defense. Depending on experience, the attorney would be expected to handle a wide variety of misdemeanor and/or felony cases, meeting with clients, interviewing witnesses, developing strategy, researching, briefing, and arguing motions, and conducting jury trials. Additionally, consistent with our offices belief in holistic representation, attorneys would be expected to assist our on-site case manager with the social needs of our clients, including addiction recovery, mental health, and familial relations, as they relate to our clients’ cases. Expect significant responsibility and trial experience early and often. Few public defender offices in the country can offer the sort of experience that our newer attorneys get on a regular basis.

Gallup is a small city in western New Mexico on the border of the Navajo Nation and the Zuni Pueblo. Approximately 75% of the people in the county (and therefore, our clients) are Native American. Thus, in addition to the typical slate of criminal law issues that most public defenders face, our cases often involve complex and sensitive issues of Federal Indian Law.

Located in the high desert of the Colorado Plateau, Gallup enjoys easy access to world class (and uncrowded) hiking, fishing, biking, camping, climbing, skiing, and other outdoor recreation. It is a world-renowned capital of Native American arts and culture, home of the Gallup Indian Ceremonial every year in August.

Minimum Qualifications: For practicing attorneys, being a member in good standing of any state’s bar and willing to obtain a Limited License to practice from the New Mexico Supreme Court.  For current 3Ls, a willingness to take the New Mexico Bar Exam.

To Apply: A full description of the position for practicing attorneys is available here.

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Expanding our reach thanks to $5M donation

On Jan. 31, we announced the $5 million gift that the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians generously gave to ASU and the Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance programs. The funds will help support our ever-growing program and allow us to extend our reach to more students who wish to study Indian law!

Read the ASU Now article here.

Thank you San Manuel Band of Mission Indians for this incredible gift!

Final Class Guest Speaker

At Professor Trevor Reed’s celebratory dinner in honor of the end of semester, Shawn Attakai (’00) was invited to present on the importance of preserving culture as a wrap-up of Reed’s class on Nov. 22. Attakai gave an extensive look into how Navajo traditions and the outlook on those traditions have changed over time.

Thank you for the captivating presentation!

Indigenous People’s Day 2019 – Students’ Thoughts

Every year, more cities and states pass orders to formally recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day (IPD) on the second Monday of October as opposed to the federally observed Columbus Day. We asked some of our students their thoughts on this topic. These are the answers we received. Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Our 12 students who took the “Federal Advocacy for the Tribal Client” class in Washington, D.C., also shared their thoughts in an Instagram takeover. Check out our highlight @ilpatasu

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Happy #NationalVoterRegistrationDay!

Happy #NationalVoterRegistrationDay! Have you registered yet? Here’s a #throwback to when Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee and the ILC helped Agnes Laughter, a Navajo elder become a registered voter in 2008. “All of my heartache has changed as of this day,” said Laughter, who was 77 at the time. “I have an identity now. My thumbprint will stand. I feel fulfilled.” 💛 Register today to be #VoteReady