2022 ILP Alumni Awards – Call for Nominations

The ILP alumni awards are now open. Nominate your classmates and friends! The ILP Awards include Professional Achievement, Alumni Service Award, and Emerging Leader Award. Nominations are due March 4, 2022! Nomination materials should be sent by email to: Kate.Rosier@asu.edu. Awards will be presented at the ILP Alumni & Friends Awards Ceremony at Fed Bar on Thursday, April 7, 2022 at Sandia Golf Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Nomination Guidelines

ILP Professional Achievement Award – This award recognizes outstanding achievement in Indian Law or Tribal Law throughout an individual’s career. The award honors ILP alumni whose achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law have brought distinction to themselves and real benefit to the Indian community. Nomination Package Requirements:

  • Describe the unique professional achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law that has brought distinction to the candidate. (maximum two pages)
  • Describe the recognized contributions made by this candidate that demonstrate a benefit to the larger community. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways in which the candidate’s achievements are truly extraordinary or exceptional. (maximum one page)
  • Provide at least two letters of support from individuals that can speak to the candidate’s impact on his or her profession.
  • Letters of support should speak to the magnitude of the individual’s impact in the practice of Indian or tribal law or in the Indian community.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Gloria Kindig (’89), Kathy Bowman (’86), Rob Rosette (’96), Diane Enos (’92), Ben Hanley (’71) and Herb Yazzie (’75).

ILP Alumni Service Award – This award is given for outstanding service to the Indian Legal Program, and is awarded for extended, extraordinary service to the Indian Legal Program. Nomination Package Requirements

  • Describe the ways in which the candidate has served or supported the ILP and the ILP alumni. Examples can include serving on committees, boards, CLEs, mentoring ILP students, or other volunteer or fundraising efforts or funding commitments. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways this service been truly extraordinary. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has benefited the ILP. (maximum one page)
  • Please provide at least two letters of support from ILP alumni as part of the nomination package.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Peter Larson (’02), Verrin Kewenvoyouma (’04), Ann Marie Downes (’94), Mary Shirley (’92) and Jeff Harmon (’05).

ILP Emerging Leader Award – This award acknowledges and encourages service to Indian Country and the ILP by alumni who are less than ten years out of law school. The award recognizes outstanding achievements in their professional career, volunteer work, and promotion or support of the ILP and/or ASU NALSA. Nomination Package Requirements.

  • Describe how the candidate has achieved professional success in their legal career.
  • Describe the candidate’s volunteer work.
  • Describe how the candidate achieved an exceptional level of service while balancing the demands of being a recent graduate. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate was proactive in efforts to become involved in ILP and/or ILP alumni activities. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has been sustained over a long period of time or how the service has been innovative or beneficial. (maximum one page)
  • Provide two letters of support from fellow ILP alumni.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Derrick Beetso (’10), Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle (’09), Nikki Borchardt Campbell (’09), Steve Bodmer (’06), Elizabeth Medicine Crow (’05), Charles Galbraith (’07), Matthew Campbell (’08) and Michael Corey Hinton (’11).

Brilliant Success

Gathering of Indigenous Legal Scholars

On Dec. 8-9, the ILP and the Native Nations Law and Policy Center at UCLA School of Law teamed up and welcomed current and future Indigenous law faculty from across the country to participate in the “Gathering of Indigenous Legal Scholars” at ASU Law. The purpose of this gathering was to cultivate a community of support for current and future legal scholars across the fields of federal Indian law and tribal law.
On the first day, four emerging Indigenous scholars presented their research to the 25 Indigenous law professors in attendance. The faculty then presented a hybrid-format webinar, “Launching Your Academic Career,” to share knowledge, tips and advice for entering the academic job market. On day two, junior and senior faculty in the field shared their current research with one another. 

The overall event highlighted just how robust scholarship in the field of Indigenous law has become, and how important rigorous legal research is to Indigenous peoples and the development of law and legal systems intended to meet their needs. The event built on previous gatherings for emerging Indigenous faculty organized by senior Indigenous scholars, including Professor Robert J. Miller

We are delighted that five ILP affiliates participated: Native Vote Fellow Torey Dolan (’19) presented “Reviving the Promises of the Indian Citizenship Act: Congress’ Trust Obligations to Protect the Native Vote,” Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee presented “Self-Determination in a Sinking Basin,” Professor Stacy Leeds presented “Essentials of Going on the Legal-Academic Job Market”, Professor Miller served on the roundtable “Developing Your Research Agenda” and Professor Trevor Reed presented “Restorative Licensing.”

We appreciate our co-host the Native Nations Law and Policy Center at UCLA School of Law and all participants for making this a successful event.

Celebrating Tribal Investments

San Manuel Band of Mission Indians

Last month, the Indian Legal Program celebrated the generosity of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians at the ASU California Center in downtown Los Angeles, located at the historic Herald Examiner building, for a special ribbon-cutting ceremony and the naming of Yuhaaviatam of San Manuel Event Center within the building. The naming of the space recognizes San Manuel’s $5 million gift for the recent renovation of the ASU California Center, and the tribe’s support for ASU Law’s Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance programs. 

San Manuel Chairman Ken Ramirez said it best: “Investing in education that underscores Native American law and tribal sovereignty is among the core values of the tribe.”

“Participating in the unveiling was an honor,” said Derrick Beetso (’10), director of ASU Law’s Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance programs. “The history of the Herald Examiner building, as described by Chairman Ramirez, indicates how special this event was for the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, and it was a pleasure to share in this experience. The Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance programs look forward to exploring new opportunities for innovative uses for the space, including practical learning experiences for our students.”

Read more in the ASU News article and review ASU Law’s video recap.

We are very happy some of our ILP students joined Professor Beetso, Professor Patty Ferguson-BohneeExecutive Director Kate Rosier and Professor Trevor Reed in this celebration, including: Ashleigh Fixico (2L), Noah Goldenberg (2L), Clayton Kinsey (1L), Francisco Olea (LLM), Sophie Staires (1L) and David Streamer (3L). During the trip, students documented and shared the experience on our Instagram for Student Takeover

Thank you, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, for your continued support!

We Conquered

On Oct. 11, we held a free one-hour webinar “Conquering Columbus: Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery.”

We appreciate our panel experts—Native Vote Fellow Torey Dolan (’19), Sarah Augustine, Douglas Lind and Professor Robert J. Miller—for leading this rising awareness discussion and helping ensure the academic landscape represents Indian Country’s full diversity and history at a national scale.

If you missed the webinar, you may watch the recording.

Impacts of Indian Gaming

The Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance programs hosted a presentation “Indian Gaming in Texas: Ysleta del Sur Pueblo v. Texas & Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas v. Texas” on Nov.10. Ronnie Thomas, treasurer for the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe, and Fred Petti, attorney for the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe, joined the ILP to discuss the history of Indian gaming in Texas and how Ysleta del Sur Pueblo v. Texas ended up before the Supreme Court. The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe submitted amicus briefs in support of the matter since the holding could result in ground-sweeping changes in how Indian gaming is conducted in Texas.

Lunch was provided at this in-person event, which was also livestreamed so the ILP’s MLS and LLM online students could participate as well. Derrick Beetso (’10), director of the Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance programs, said, “I really enjoyed this event. The representatives from the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe shared important and interesting perspectives on how amici can help further collective litigation goals in Indian Country. I thought it was an important and practical discussion to have that is not always explained in law school courses.” 

“I’m inspired by the actions of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe because the purpose of pursuing legal action was not solely about Indian gaming, but how this activity could serve the tribe for the next seven generations,” said 3L Hilary Edwards . “Mr. Thomas shared how his tribal community has benefitted from the tribal gaming facility, like supporting tribal members to achieve higher education. I was encouraged when Mr. Thomas said, ‘We encourage our tribal students who achieve higher education to get off-reservation experience and then bring that experience back to work for the tribe.’ This is precisely what I strive to accomplish. I desire to be qualified with experience to be able to contribute and serve my tribal community. These events further validate my decision to attend law school and further encourages me to continue on with the fight.”

Celebrating NALSA

Twelve ASU Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) students received the Native American Bar Association of Arizona (NABA-AZ) Scholarship for their academic achievement at the “NABA-AZ Seven Generations Virtual Awards Event and Silent Auction.” Congratulations to all the recipients, especially our ILP students: Hilary Edwards (3L), Dallon Echo Hawk (3L), Brittany Habbart (2L), Michael LaValley (2L), Victorialyn McCarthy (1L), Brianna Minjarez (3L), Cierra Moore (3L), Lena Neuner (2L), Taylor Norman (2L), Autumn Shone (2L), Alexandra Trousdale (1L) and Ruben Zendejas (2L). 

“NABA-AZ is proud to support these talented law students,” said NABA-AZ President and ILP Executive Director Kate Rosier. “The future is bright!”

We appreciate the committed support of NABA-AZ.

ASU Navajo Nation Law CLE 2021: Call for Presentations

The Indian Legal Program at ASU Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law is proud to host the 2021 Navajo Nation Law CLE Conference on Friday, October 15, 2021.

The Navajo Nation Law CLE Conference will offer a one day survey of Navajo law and ethics. This conference is ideal training for attorneys practicing on and near the Navajo Nation, tribal court advocates, tribal court practitioners, tribal court
prosecutors, tribal court defenders, tribal council members, Indian law
attorneys, tribal liaisons, government legislators, Navajo Nation Bar members,
law students, as well as teachers/professors and students of American Indian
studies.

The Conference Planning Committee welcomes proposals for 30-minute, 60-minute or 90-minute conference presentations or panel discussions. To submit a presentation proposal, please send the following information by July 30, 2021:

  • Presenter(s) name, title, contact information, bio
  • Title of the proposed presentation
  • A brief (one paragraph) description of the presentation, how the presentation relates to Navajo Law, and a description of the presentation format (example: lecture with Q&A, panel discussion, etc.)
  • A brief description of what will be or could be distributed to attendees as materials
  • A two-sentence summary of the presentation for the conference program, if accepted
  • Length of presentation
  • Would this session qualify for Navajo Ethics?

Participants will be notified of their selection by August 13, 2021.

Please submit your abstract here: ilp@asu.edu Subject: Navajo Law CLE Proposal

Pathway to Law

Online Sessions

6-weeks | Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday | 90-minutes

In its seventh year, the Native American Pathway to Law, formerly known as the Pipeline to Law, is proud to host online sessions June 8-16 in lieu of the prior workshop. These sessions offer advice and guidance for those interested in pursuing a legal education to help applicants navigate all the tests, applications and funding, and ease some of the pressure.

In her recent interview with Native News Online, Kate Rosier, ILP director and assistant dean of institutional progress, said: “We basically act like aunties and uncles, helping people figure out what they need, and what they want from a law school.” The article, “Pathway to Law Initiative Offers ‘Auntie’ Mentorship to Native Kids,” is a great capture of the intent of the initiative. In an effort to lessen confusion and redirect the focus of this initiative, the name was changed to Pathway to Law.

We invite future law students to join our qualified presenters and student speakers to learn from experts on how to get into law school.

Applications are due by Monday, May 3.

If you know any of any students interested, have them apply at: law.asu.edu/pathwaytolaw.

 

Download the PDF flyer.

2021 Pipeline to Law: Online Sessions

The Native American Pipeline to Law Pre-Law team will be hosting Online Sessions this summer. These sessions will help students successfully navigate the law school application process. It doesn’t matter which school you are coming from and which school you choose, we want to help you get there.

  • Develop an effective application, resume, and personal statement
  • Explore law school funding options
  • Receive test prep tips for the LSAT
  • Hear from former and current American Indian law students

Apply by May 3. Spots fill up fast!

Submit your application at: law.asu.edu/pipelinetolaw

2021 ILP Alumni Awards – Call for Nominations

The ILP alumni awards are now open. Nominate your classmates and friends! The ILP Awards include Professional Achievement, Alumni Service Award, and Emerging Leader Award. Nominations are due March 5, 2021! Nomination materials should be sent by email to: Kate.Rosier@asu.edu. Awards will be presented at the ILP Alumni & Friends Virtual Awards Ceremony. Details for date, time and location will be shared soon.

Nomination Guidelines

ILP Professional Achievement Award – This award recognizes outstanding achievement in Indian Law or Tribal Law throughout an individual’s career. The award honors ILP alumni whose achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law have brought distinction to themselves and real benefit to the Indian community. Nomination Package Requirements:

  • Describe the unique professional achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law that has brought distinction to the candidate. (maximum two pages)
  • Describe the recognized contributions made by this candidate that demonstrate a benefit to the larger community. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways in which the candidate’s achievements are truly extraordinary or exceptional. (maximum one page)
  • Provide at least two letters of support from individuals that can speak to the candidate’s impact on his or her profession.
  • Letters of support should speak to the magnitude of the individual’s impact in the practice of Indian or tribal law or in the Indian community.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Kathy Bowman (’86), Rob Rosette (’96), Diane Enos (’92), Ben Hanley (’71), Herb Yazzie (’75).

ILP Alumni Service Award – This award is given for outstanding service to the Indian Legal Program, and is awarded for extended, extraordinary service to the Indian Legal Program. Nomination Package Requirements

  • Describe the ways in which the candidate has served or supported the ILP and the ILP alumni. Examples can include serving on committees, boards, CLEs, mentoring ILP students, or other volunteer or fundraising efforts or funding commitments. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways this service been truly extraordinary. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has benefited the ILP. (maximum one page)
  • Please provide at least two letters of support from ILP alumni as part of the nomination package.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Verrin Kewenvoyouma (’04), Ann Marie Downes (’94), Mary Shirley (’92) and Jeff Harmon (’05)

ILP Emerging Leader Award – This award acknowledges and encourages service to Indian Country and the ILP by alumni who are less than ten years out of law school. The award recognizes outstanding achievements in their professional career, volunteer work, and promotion or support of the ILP and/or ASU NALSA. Nomination Package Requirements.

  • Describe how the candidate has achieved professional success in their legal career.
  • Describe the candidate’s volunteer work.
  • Describe how the candidate achieved an exceptional level of service while balancing the demands of being a recent graduate. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate was proactive in efforts to become involved in ILP and/or ILP alumni activities. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has been sustained over a long period of time or how the service has been innovative or beneficial. (maximum one page)
  • Provide two letters of support from fellow ILP alumni.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle (’09), Nikki Borchardt Campbell (’09), Steve Bodmer (’06), Elizabeth Medicine Crow (’05), Charles Galbraith (’07), Matthew Campbell (’08) and Michael Corey Hinton (’11)