Job opportunity: Attorney-Adviser

Department of the Interior
Office of the Solicitor
Phoenix, AZ

This position is in the excepted service and not subject to competitive service procedures.
Merit promotion procedures do not apply.
This vacancy may be used to fill additional positions as vacancies become available.

As an Attorney-Adviser with the Department of the Interior, Office of the SolicitorIntermountain region, Phoenix Field Office, located in Phoenix, AZyour specific duties will include:

  • Providing advice on and legal services for matters pertaining to the various agencies within the Department of the Interior, primarily for, but not limited to, the Bureau of Land Management and the Bureau of Reclamation.
  • Providing advice and legal services on the topics of public lands management and western water law relating to laws and regulations of general applicability to Federal agencies, such as the Federal Land Management and Policy Act, National Environmental Policy Act, Endangered Species Act, Migratory Bird Treaty Act, National Reclamation Act, and other relevant federal laws.
  • Providing litigation support on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior and various Interior agencies, including the Bureau of Land Management and the Bureau of Reclamation, to the Department of Justice and practicing before the Interior Board of Land Appeals.
  • Involves knowledge of water law; public lands law; federal and state litigation procedure; the federal Indian trust responsibility and statutes relating to interactions between the federal government and Tribes; federal environmental laws; real property laws; contracts, financial assistance, and cooperative agreements.
  • Requires the ability to analyze legal requirements and succinctly provide advice and counsel to technical/non-legal professionals; and the ability to interact and negotiate with outside entities, including Tribes, States, and local governmental entities, regarding contracts, agreements, and other matters.

For full job description and to apply, go to Job Posting.

Job opportunity: Associate Attorney Position

Hobbs, Straus, Dean & Walker, LLP is seeking applications for an Associate Attorney who will work in-person in the Washington, DC office.

Hobbs Straus is a national law firm with offices in Washington, DC; Portland, OR; Oklahoma City, OK; and Sacramento, CA.  Hobbs Straus specializes in Federal Indian Law and has worked for 40 years to realize positive change in Indian Country.  Our attorneys are dedicated to promoting and defending Tribal Nations’ rights and exercise of sovereignty, expanding opportunities for Tribal Nations, and improving the lives of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Qualifications for candidates include:

  • A strong academic performance;
  • Superior research and writing skills;
  • Strong communication skills; and
  • A commitment to Federal Indian Law.

The position would begin immediately upon hire.

To apply, interested candidates should submit a cover letter, resume, unofficial law school transcript, writing sample, and references to Tisa Perry at bperry@hobbsstraus.com.

Please reach out to Tisa or to Katie Klass at kklass@hobbsstraus.com with any questions.  We will contact all applicants after we make our hiring decision.  However, should you receive another offer or otherwise want an update before you hear from us, please reach out to Tisa or Katie.

Thank you for your interest in Hobbs, Straus, Dean & Walker, LLP.

Washington, DC Office Location:
1899 L Street, NW, Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20036
(202) 822-8282

Job opening: ASU Tribal Relations Director

Arizona State University
Office of Government & Community Engagement

Serves as primary liaison between the University and tribal nations/communities locally, regionally, and globally to develop partnerships and seek to embrace and connect with tribal communities enabling both success of American Indian students by providing a climate of cultural respect and inclusion, and research integrity when working with tribal nations, communities, and native people.

Works in partnership with the Special Advisor to the President to assist the Office of American Indian initiatives.

See job announcement (pdf) and apply.

Call for articles

The Law Journal for Social Justice (LJSJ) at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law is seeking articles, notes, or comments for our Spring 2024 issue. We publish articles on a range of interdisciplinary topics at the intersection of law and social justice. In our Spring 2024 publication, we are looking for articles on topics centering around violent crime, Indigenous issues, and social justice. 

If you would like to submit your work for publication in Volume XIX of the Law Journal for Social Justice, you can submit your article to ljsjeic@gmail.com or to Managing Editor Tyler DeMers at tjdemers@asu.edu

Additionally, LJSJ is currently seeking out Symposium panelists who are interested in speaking on the topics of violent crime, Indigenous issues, and social justice for our Spring Symposium in February of 2024. If you have legal scholarship or research on these topics and are interested in participating in the Symposium, or if you have any questions regarding the Symposium, please feel free to contact Symposium Natalia Sells (3L) at nlsells@asu.edu

For more information regarding the Law Journal for Social Justice, please go to: https://lawjournalforsocialjustice.com/.

Job opportunities with New Mexico Legal Aid

New Mexico Legal Aid (NMLA) provides civil legal services to low-income New Mexicans for a variety of legal issues including domestic violence/family law, consumer protection, housing, and benefits. NMLA has locations throughout the state including Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Cruces, Gallup, Roswell, Silver City, Clovis, Hobbs, Las Vegas, Taos, and Santa Ana.

Staff Attorney posting 8.4.2023

Director for Native American Program 8.1.2023

Pathways to the Bench: Honorable Diane J. Humetewa (’93)

As the first Native American federal judge, Honorable Diane J. Humetewa (’93) holds her Hopi tribal homelands close to her heart. Being in a position that serves a great purpose has allowed her to mentor and empower future Native American leaders. In Nov. 2022, she invited ASU Law students to visit her chambers and learn about her pathway to the bench.

Job opportunities: Judicial Branch of the Navajo Nation

Court Solicitor (244326) – Window Rock, AZ

District Court Clerk (909557) – Tuba City, AZ

District Court Clerk (909563) – Kayenta, AZ

District Court Clerk (240815) – Shiprock, NM

District Court Clerk (112557) – Window Rock, AZ

District Court Clerk (209528) – Window Rock, AZ

District Court Clerk (209534) – Window Rock, AZ

Staff Attorney (240874) – Aneth, UT

Staff Attorney (234987) – Kayenta, AZ

Staff Attorney (211848) – Tuba City, AZ

Associate Justice * (209546) – Window Rock, AZ

District Court Judge * (00000) – District Court, Navajo Nation Wide

 

For full list of job announcements, go to Judicial Branch of the Navajo Nation.

Tribal Court Trial Skills 2023

After a multi-year postponement due to pandemic-related safety concerns, the Indian Legal Clinic was very excited to once again present its bi-annual Tribal Court Trial Skills College for tribal court practitioners.  
  
The Trial Skills College was an intensive, four-day session that provided practical, hands-on training for advocates to develop and refine the skills necessary to try cases in tribal court. The program culminated in a mock trial held on the last day. 
  
Held in May, twelve tribal court advocates from Arizona, New Mexico, Wyoming and Montana participated.  
  
Students praised the program for the guidance it provided them and the cameraderie experienced throughout the event. In addition to the classroom and simulated training received, the Trial Skills College provided the tribal court lay advocates with a rare opportunity to gather and share with others in similar positions at other tribal nations.  
  
ASU Law alumni served as trial consultants for the students and presented as members of the faculty on topics ranging from ethics to closing arguments including Landon Antelman (’11), Fernando J. Anzaldua (’13), Derrick Beetso(’10), Helen Burtis (’07), Jennifer Giff (’95), Ed Hermes (’13) and Ben Rundall(’14). The Honorable Anthony Hill (’06), Honorable Kaniatarí:io Jesse Gilbert(’07) and Kevin Pooley (’15) served as judges during the simulated trial.  
 
Other experienced litigators and judges who volunteered their service included Eric Dahlstrom, Louis Mallette, Sonia Martinez, Pilar Thomas, Jose Valles, and the Honorable Ida Wilber. 

____
Helen Burtis (’07)
Faculty Associate, Indian Legal Clinic, ASU Law

Indigenizing the legal profession

The ILP teamed up with its Native American Pathway to Law Initiative partners – University of California, Berkeley School of Law’s Admissions Office, Michigan State University College of Law’s Indigenous Law and Policy Center and Pre-Law Summer Institute, and American Indian Law Center, Inc. – and hosted its ninth annual Pathway to Law workshop at ASU Law. The program brought together 43 Native American students representing 30 tribes to learn about the law school admissions process, and tools and resources to support their law journey.  

Stacy Leeds, Willard H. Pedrick Dean and Regents Professor of Law, gave a warm welcome to the class, discussed brief Indian Law history, and shared her wisdom and tips. Patty Ferguson-Bohnee, ILP Faculty Director, also extended a hearty welcome to the students. 

Wenona Singel, Professor of Law and Associate Director of the Indigenous Law & Policy Center at Michigan State University (MSU Law) presented “Indigenizing the Legal Profession” and provided insight on Native American lawyers in the United States. 

Kristen Theis-Alvarez, Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at Berkeley Law, provided her expertise in several panels covering the law school admissions timeline and how to create a strong application packet.

To empower the students, Native law professionals Diandra Benally (’05), Torey Dolan (’19), Joseph Flies-Away (’04), Michelle Fox, Kiyoko Patterson (’03) and Denten Robinson presented on a panel “Why we need more Native attorneys.” Law students Gabe Dowell (2L), Keely Driscoll (2L), Shandiin Herrera (2L), Maryam Salazar (3L) and Berkeley Law 2L Robin Martinez shared their current experiences in law school during the panel presentation “Our journeys, in our own voices.” Both panel sessions were moderated by attorney Jeremy Aliason. 

Simon Goldenberg (’17) and Cassondra Church discussed an overview of law school in their presentation “3 years in a Nut Shell.” 

“One of the first courses you’re going to take in law school is Property Law,” said Professor Trevor Reed in his mock class. “It’s a complicated subject because it’s all about ownership.” Students were given cases to read and prepare for Professor Reed’s class and learned about briefing the case and best argument.

ILP Executive Director Kate Rosier and Theis-Alvarez co-presented “Choosing where to apply.” 

Pathway ICT Kate interview

During the Pathway to Law Workshop, Rosier joined Indian Country Today and talked about the history of the Native American Pathway to Law Initiative and positive outcomes of the program. 

Rodina Cave Parnall, Executive Director of the American Indian Law Center presented on “Extending the pipeline: an intro to PLSI.”

Joseph Lindsay, Director of Admissions and Operations at Berkeley Law, presented “Financial aid: resources and considerations for Native law students.”

We appreciate all of the partners, ILP faculty, staff and alumni, attorneys and law students for supporting these motivated Native American students and their bright future.

This was the largest workshop to date, congratulations to the Pathway to Law national team: Cassondra Church and Wenona Singel, Indigenous Law & Policy Center, Michigan State University College of Law; Joseph Lindsay and Kristin Theis-Alvarez, Berkeley Law; Rodina Cave Parnall (’01), American Indian Law Center, Inc.; and Kate Rosier, ILP at ASU Law.