Job Opportunity – General Attorney

General Attorney – Full-Time
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Customs and Border Protection
Office of Chief Counsel

Open & Closing dates:
02/17/2021 to 03/02/2021

Locations: 2 vacancies in Glynco, GA

Summary:
As our nation navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, CBP is committed to delivering our mission to safeguard America’s borders and enable legitimate trade and travel. Staffing mission critical positions remains a high priority. Be reassured that CBP is still hiring, despite potential hiring process step delays due to restrictions to in-person activities.

Requirements:
• You must be a U.S. Citizen to apply for this position
• Males born after 12/31/1959 must be registered with Selective Service
• Primary U.S. residency for at least three of the last five years (additional details below)
• You may be required to pass a background investigation
• CBP follows the DHS Drug-Free Workplace Plan for drug testing procedures
• As an employee of CBP, you will be joining a workforce that is dedicated to accomplishing our mission while maintaining the trust of our Nation by strictly adhering to all government ethics standards.

See full job announcement and application details:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/592501200

Agency Contact Information:
Phone: 952-857-2932

Job Opportunity – General Attorney

General Attorney – Full-Time
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Customs and Border Protection
Office of Chief Counsel

Open & Closing Dates:
02/18/2021 to 03/03/2021

Locations: 1 vacancy in Los Angeles, CA

Summary:
As our nation navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, CBP is committed to delivering our mission to safeguard America’s borders and enable legitimate trade and travel. Staffing mission critical positions remains a high priority. Be reassured that CBP is still hiring, despite potential hiring process step delays due to restrictions to in-person activities.

Requirements:
• You must be a U.S. Citizen to apply for this position
• Males born after 12/31/1959 must be registered with Selective Service
• Primary U.S. residency for at least three of the last five years (additional details below)
• You may be required to pass a background investigation
• CBP follows the DHS Drug-Free Workplace Plan for drug testing procedures
• As an employee of CBP, you will be joining a workforce that is dedicated to accomplishing our mission while maintaining the trust of our Nation by strictly adhering to all government ethics standards.

See full job announcement and application details:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/592628700

For further information please contact:
Shelby Stuntz
Phone: (562) 980-3141

Professor Larry Roberts leveling up his Indian Gaming Law class

Professor Larry Roberts brought game to his Indian Gaming Law class this semester, which has been held via Zoom during the pandemic. Student teams reviewed Indian gaming regulatory history while playing Jeopardy and during a fast game of Family Feud.

Jeopardy was neck and neck until end. Team 1’s Peter Furlow and and Team 2’s Zaine Ristau faced off in final jeopardy. Team 1 won Jeopardy by the narrowest of margins: one dollar. Protip for those who haven’t played Indian Gaming Jeopardy – if you don’t know the answer, go with “What is the Secretary of the Interior?”

The class ran through two lightening rounds of Family Feud, reviewing the components of HR 1920 and dissenting views of HR 1920; the game ended in a tie. But the class wasn’t all games, they continued on to discuss the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and its legislative history.

In Memory of Claudette White (’05)

We mourn the loss of Judge Claudette White, ASU Law class of 2005. Judge White served as a judge for many tribal communities and was recently elected to serve as a council member for the Quechan Tribe. Claudette was a popular figure in Indian Country due to her quick wit, warm smile and dedication to Indian law and justice. She gained deserved notoriety after being featured in the 2017 PBS film documentary “Tribal Justice.” The documentary featured Judge White and another tribal judge as they worked to use traditional concepts of justice to reduce incarceration and improve community safety. Claudette was always finding ways to give back, and we appreciate her efforts to present at ILP events, speak to students, and assist with tribal court trainings.

Most recently, Claudette performed with the Quechan Lightening Singers to open the inauguration events of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris where she was able to personally congratulate them for their win and said she “would also like to thank both of them for their commitment to upholding the U.S. trust responsibility to tribal nations and our sacred lands, with the promise to restore lands, and protect the natural cultural resources within them.”

Claudette’s kindness, laughter, and friendship will be missed by all. Read more on Claudette’s legacy in Indian Country Today’s article.

Our deepest condolences go out to her son, Zion, and her family and friends.

If you’d like to send funds to support her medical and funeral expenses, go here.

Impacting the next gen

ILP Director and Assistant Dean Kate Rosier is co-teaching Law 394: Law School Foundations with Assistant Dean Ray English, ASU Law Office of Career and Employment Services. The course was created to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop the skills necessary to apply to law school and succeed in law school. Students take part in an intensive LSAT preparation course, and will learn about the law school application process and application strategies. Students will also have opportunities to network with law school administrators, law students, lawyers and judges. Over the course of the semester, the students will be exposed to legal constructions of the courts in the United States and Arizona, including the function of courts and judges. Students will also participate in legal analysis exercises, draft legal memorandums and make oral arguments. 

This course was based on the course previously taught by Jeremiah Chin (’15) and Dr. Bryan Brayboy. We appreciate their great work and forward thinking.    

Progress, Power, Purpose: Doreen Nanibaa McPaul (’01)

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on Native women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. Native women have been making history since the beginning of time and this Navajo woman of the Kinyaa’aanii clan has armed herself with extensive legal and government knowledge: clerked at the Arizona Court of Appeals, worked as a staff attorney for the Navajo Nation Judicial Branch, former associate attorney at the Nordhaus Law Firm, served as a visiting clinical law professor and Interim Director of ASU Law’s Indian Legal Clinic and now, back to working with her people on the Navajo Nation.

Q: What does your current position entail?

A: I am the Navajo Nation Attorney General. In that capacity, I serve as the Nation’s Chief Legal Officer and oversee the Nation’s Department of Justice, including the Office of the Prosecutor and the Navajo Hopi Legal Services Program. The Department of Justice is charged with providing legal representation to the Navajo Nation government, including the 3 Branches of government, the various Executive Branch Departments and Divisions, and the 110 local governing Chapters.

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work?
A: I knew I wanted to practice Indian law and work with tribal entities. I’ve now worked as an attorney for tribal governments for 13 years and also I have chaired a national organization committed to the work of tribal government attorneys for 8 years.

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area?
A: Working as an in-house attorney is challenging and rewarding. I actually left my law firm job when I was expecting my first child because I was convinced that I couldn’t be a good mom and a good billable law firm lawyer. I thought I had to choose. I also didn’t have any role models at the time to know that there are some seriously amazing women who are doing both! The blessing in disguise though is that I discovered my passion working as a tribal government attorney.

Q: What is your proudest career moment?
A: Being appointed as Attorney General for my own tribe.

Q: Is there anything you’ve learned after graduating law school that you wished you learned in class?
A: I wish I’d taken a clinical course. So much of what we do requires practical knowledge and skills. I did take Professor Robert Clinton’s tribal government class and got to draft a juvenile code with Judge Flies Away for a tribe in Minnesota. It was a profoundly rewarding and practical experience.

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career?
A:
Professor Rebecca Tsosie encouraged me to try out for law review and to apply for a judicial clerkship – opportunities that I didn’t know existed and that I would not have sought without her encouragement. I did try out for law review and served as a staff writer my 3L year, and I also applied for a clerkship and was selected for one with the Arizona Court of Appeals for post-law school. It made my 3L year and studying for the bar easier knowing I had a job lined up.

Q: Who are three Native American women law professionals and/or advocates who should be on our radar right now?
A: There are so many amazing Native women legal professionals doing amazing work across Indian country who we all know and love. One who should be on everyone’s radar is Paulene Abeyta. She is a 3L at the University of Arizona and currently serves as the President of National NALSA. She is Navajo, she is a military spouse, she is a mom, and she’s an incredible human being. Amber Holland is another to have on the radar. She is Lumbee, a UNM law grad, and just finished a gig at NCAI and will join the Big Fire law firm. Paulene and Amber are going to be wonderful advocates for Indian Country. Last but not least is Lydia Locklear. I serve on a Judicial Clerkship Committee with Lydia and she is impressive! She is Lumbee, a Michigan State law grad, and serves as Deputy Tribal Attorney for the Catawba Nation.

Q: In your career, did you ever feel like the lone Native American voice in the room? How did you overcome those adversities? For that girl/woman who is finding her rhythm and trying to carve out a space to thrive, what advice would you give her?
A: I’ve been the only woman in the room and I’ve also been the only Native American at the table. I’ve also been introduced as the Navajo Nation Attorney General alongside a male colleague, and the person I was introduced to extended a “nice to meet you Mr. Attorney General” to my colleague.

My advice is to be bold, be brave, and know that you deserve a seat at that table and that your perspective, your knowledge, and your skills are valuable. Also, find and surround yourself with support systems of other women who you can rely on for honesty and perspective.

Q: Favorite law school memory.
A: Hanging out in the ILP student break room upstairs at the old law school, and the ILP graduation.

Review Doreen’s publications:

Continue to Progress, Power, Purpose series.

________

Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

Job Opportunity – Full Time Attorney

Arizona Voice for Crime Victims (AVCV)

Summary: The legal representation will be limited to asserting and enforcing victims’ constitutional and/or statutory rights in criminal proceedings.

Requirements:

  • J.D. from an accredited law school
  • Membership in good standing with the State Bar of Arizona and the District of Arizona
  • Having reliable transportation and being able to travel throughout Arizona frequently, occasional out of state travel
  • Passing a background check
  • Being able to obtain a fingerprint card

Qualifications: Ideal candidate will have in-depth knowledge of the Federal Crime Victims’ Rights Act and the Arizona Victims’ Bill of Rights

  • Experience working with members of tribes
  • Experience in the state and federal criminal justice system
  • Excellent research, writing, and oral argument skills
  • Ability to  handle a heavy case load
  • Excellent communication and organizational skills

Duties:

  • Appearing in court with victims
  • Conducting research on victims’ right issues
  • Drafting legal pleadings
  • Working with social workers/victim advocates to assist victims throughout the criminal justice process  
  • Assisting with office coverage

Interested applicants should send a cover letter, resume, references, and writing sample to colleen.avcv@gmail.com

2021 ILP Alumni Awards – Call for Nominations

The ILP alumni awards are now open. Nominate your classmates and friends! The ILP Awards include Professional Achievement, Alumni Service Award, and Emerging Leader Award. Nominations are due March 5, 2021! Nomination materials should be sent by email to: Kate.Rosier@asu.edu. Awards will be presented at the ILP Alumni & Friends Virtual Awards Ceremony. Details for date, time and location will be shared soon.

Nomination Guidelines

ILP Professional Achievement Award – This award recognizes outstanding achievement in Indian Law or Tribal Law throughout an individual’s career. The award honors ILP alumni whose achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law have brought distinction to themselves and real benefit to the Indian community. Nomination Package Requirements:

  • Describe the unique professional achievements in the field of Indian Law or Tribal Law that has brought distinction to the candidate. (maximum two pages)
  • Describe the recognized contributions made by this candidate that demonstrate a benefit to the larger community. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways in which the candidate’s achievements are truly extraordinary or exceptional. (maximum one page)
  • Provide at least two letters of support from individuals that can speak to the candidate’s impact on his or her profession.
  • Letters of support should speak to the magnitude of the individual’s impact in the practice of Indian or tribal law or in the Indian community.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Kathy Bowman (’86), Rob Rosette (’96), Diane Enos (’92), Ben Hanley (’71), Herb Yazzie (’75).

ILP Alumni Service Award – This award is given for outstanding service to the Indian Legal Program, and is awarded for extended, extraordinary service to the Indian Legal Program. Nomination Package Requirements

  • Describe the ways in which the candidate has served or supported the ILP and the ILP alumni. Examples can include serving on committees, boards, CLEs, mentoring ILP students, or other volunteer or fundraising efforts or funding commitments. (maximum one page)
  • Describe the ways this service been truly extraordinary. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has benefited the ILP. (maximum one page)
  • Please provide at least two letters of support from ILP alumni as part of the nomination package.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Verrin Kewenvoyouma (’04), Ann Marie Downes (’94), Mary Shirley (’92) and Jeff Harmon (’05)

ILP Emerging Leader Award – This award acknowledges and encourages service to Indian Country and the ILP by alumni who are less than ten years out of law school. The award recognizes outstanding achievements in their professional career, volunteer work, and promotion or support of the ILP and/or ASU NALSA. Nomination Package Requirements.

  • Describe how the candidate has achieved professional success in their legal career.
  • Describe the candidate’s volunteer work.
  • Describe how the candidate achieved an exceptional level of service while balancing the demands of being a recent graduate. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate was proactive in efforts to become involved in ILP and/or ILP alumni activities. (maximum one page)
  • Describe how the candidate’s service has been sustained over a long period of time or how the service has been innovative or beneficial. (maximum one page)
  • Provide two letters of support from fellow ILP alumni.
  • Provide a 200 word bio of the nominee.
  • Past winners include: Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle (’09), Nikki Borchardt Campbell (’09), Steve Bodmer (’06), Elizabeth Medicine Crow (’05), Charles Galbraith (’07), Matthew Campbell (’08) and Michael Corey Hinton (’11)

Job Opportunity – General Attorney

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY – Customs and Border Protection – Office of Chief Counsel

Salary: $65,190.00 – $142,732.00

Closing date: 2/11/2021

Position Summary:

As our nation navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, CBP is committed to delivering our mission to safeguard America’s borders and enable legitimate trade and travel. Staffing mission critical positions remains a high priority. Be reassured that CBP is still hiring, despite potential hiring process step delays due to restrictions to in-person activities.

Qualifications:

  • Applicant must be a graduate from a full course of study in a School of Law accredited by the American Bar Association and be an active member in good standing of the bar of a state, territory of the United States, the District of Columbia or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
  • Specialized Education: Recent law school graduates may be appointed to attorney positions at the GS-11 level with the following additional qualifications: rank in the top 1/3 of graduating class; participation on the school’s official Law Review; membership in the Order of the Coif; or winning of a moot court competition.
  • An interim appointment of 14 months may be made pending the selectee’s admission to the bar.
  • Selectee will be required to provide admittance and standing to the Bar and must provide a copy of their official law school transcript.
  • Experience refers to paid and unpaid experience, including volunteer work done through National Service programs (e.g., Peace Corps, AmeriCorps) and other organizations (e.g., professional; philanthropic; religious; spiritual; community, student, social).

 Responsibilities:

  • Providing legal advice to, and legal representation of, Customs and Border Protection (CBP’s) National Finance Center, Revenue Division, Procurement Division, Facilities Management & Engineering Division, Environmental and Energy Division (Office of Enterprise Services), Office of Trade, Office of Field Operations, and other CBP offices throughout the United States;
  • Performing legal research into laws, regulations, decisions and other precedents bearing on legal issues involving CBP, particularly in the areas of federal appropriations, bankruptcy, collections (primarily customs duties, liquidated damages, fees and charges), contract, construction, employment, environmental, international trade, real property and tort law;
  • Assisting the Department of Justice in civil action involving CBP by preparing litigation reports, affidavits, and other pleading, and participating in discovery, motion drafting, settlement discussions, and providing litigation support in a variety of matters such as complex trade cases generally involving the collection of revenue, actions brought under federal statutes such as the False Claims Act, procurement disputes filed in federal courts, and condemnation actions; and also representing CBP in various third party administrative hearings involving matters such as employee discipline and adverse actions, arbitrations, EEO discrimination complaints, Merit Systems Principles Board (MSPB) appeals, contract and travel/relocation disputes before the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, and employee overpayment hearings; and
  • Advocating for claims filed on behalf of the Government and provides legal opinions and advice concerning resolution of claims against the government arising out of CBP operations.
  • Travel Required Occasional travel – You may be expected to travel for this position.

See full job announcement and application details: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/590767100