Job opportunity: Tribal Policy Manager

Washington State Office of the Attorney General

The Attorney General’s Office is recruiting for an exempt full time Tribal Policy Manager in the Policy Unit. This position may be located in Seattle or Olympia, Washington, and is not union-represented

Exempt Salary Range: $90,000 – $101,581.

This position will remain open until filled, with an anticipated first review of application in mid-March, 2025. It is in the applicants’ best interest to submit applications as early as possible. This posting may be closed at any time without warning.

Required Education & Experience

  • Bachelor’s degree in public policy, law, political science, criminal justice, government, economics, or related field.

OR

  • Seven or more years of relevant work experience.

Skills & Abilities
The most competitive applicants will possess the following qualifications:

  • Tribal policy experience
  • Excellent, persuasive writing skills
  • Archival research experience
  • Trauma-informed approaches to community engagement
  • Racial equity analysis experience
  • Experience developing and executing community engagement plans for historically excluded communities

Review full job description: 02652 Emmett Till Sr. Policy Mgr #2897 

Submit your application, including a current resume and letter of interest at:

Emmett Till Tribal Policy Analyst

Or via email to Judith.Vandergeest@atg.wa.gov

ASU Law students sworn into local Tribal Court

On Jan. 29, Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee and Indian Legal Clinic students Keely Driscoll (2L), Samir Grover (3L) and Chelsi Tsosie (3L) traveled to the Gila River Indian Community Courthouse in Sacaton, Arizona. Students were sworn into the Gila River Community Court by Chief Judge Anthony Hill (’06). Judge Charles Aragon led an informative tour during which the students met other judges and staff. 

While touring the facility, students met GRIC prosecutors Ammon Orr (’16) and Carleton Giff.

As a first-time student attorney, Grover and Driscoll recently appeared before the Ak-Chin Indian Community Court in Maricopa, Arizona for hearings on behalf of clients. 

Samir Grover (3L) in front of the Ak-Chin Multi-Purpose Justice Complex

“It gives me an opportunity to apply skills I have learned and engage in meaningful work that helps real people,” said Grover. “It also gives me an advantage once I actually become a lawyer. I am glad I got my first time representing a client at arraignment over with. Also, meeting with the client in-person prior to the arraignment and going over plea options was surreal. I felt like I’m finally engaging in the type of work I envisioned myself doing, especially by representing a client in the Ak-Chin Indian Community Court.”

Chelsi Tsosie (member of the Navajo Nation) being sworn into the Gila River Indian Community Court by Chief Judge Hill

“Practicing in a tribal courtroom during law school has brought so much meaning to the concepts, rules and advice I’ve learned in classes so far,” said Tsosie. “I think because of that, I’m going to enter my future career as a more effective advocate than I would have without it. Not only that, the experience of observing Ak-Chin Indian Community implement its sovereignty through its court system was insightful. I’m thankful the Indian Legal Clinic has provided this opportunity to work with clients in a real impactful way.”

We appreciate the Gila River Indian Community Courthouse and Ak-Chin Indian Community Court for providing our law students with practical training to become effective advocates for justice.

Pictured outside the Gila River Indian Community Court (left to right): Samir Grover (3L), Keely Driscoll (2L), Prosecutor Ammon Orr ('16), Chelsi Tsosie (3L) and Charlie Giff.

Job opportunity: Gaming attorney

The Hopi Tribe is seek experienced attorneys or law firms to provide the Hopi Tribe legal advice and representation on its behalf in matters involving Arizona Indian Gaming.

Proposal due date: March 29, 2024 at 5:00 P.M. (Arizona Time)

Contact: Office of General Counsel (928) 734-3141

Email proposals to: NPoneoma@hopi.nsn.us

Detailed scope of work:

The selected Contractor will provide the following services to the Hopi Tribe:

The Contractor will provide legal services to the Hopi Tribe in connection with the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, matters under the Arizona Tribal State Gaming Compact (Compact) and applicable Hopi Tribe laws and policies. 

Specifically, the Attorney will work on amendments, negotiations and implementations of the Tribal State Compact. The Contractor will assist the Office of General Counsel with transactional services which includes, but not limited to review and drafting Hopi Tribe laws and policies with respect to gaming regulatory, drafting of contracts, review of licensing issues, amendments, negotiations and implementation of the Compacts and any ancillary issues related to the aforementioned.

Experience in the field of Gaming, Indian is essential.  Experience in Hopi tribal law is preferred. Demonstration of these qualifications should include information indicating the depth of experience and the nature of legal services in which you or your firm has been involved over time.

See job announcement: gaming attorney (2024)

Pathway to Law alum: Morgan Oakes

Morgan Oakes
Saint Regis Mohawk
Pathway to Law Workshop ’21 
Pre-Law Summer Institute ’22
JD candidate ’25, Indian Legal Program, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University

What information did you find most important in the Workshop (i.e. LSAT prep, personal statement building, etc) and why?
Kate was very informative during the workshop and it provided me with pertinent information about the law school application process. 

Would you recommend students interested in law to attend the Workshop? 
I would recommend students interested in law to attend the Workshop, especially because it provides reimbursement for LSAT prep classes. 

Do you have any tips for prospective students? 
My tip for incoming law students is to start studying for the LSAT early, a year out was ideal for me.

Read more Native American Pathway to Law Initiative: Student Success Stories

Pathway to Law alum: Robin Bilagody

Robin Bilagody
Gila River Indian Community
Pathway to Law Workshop ’19 
Pre-Law Summer Institute ’21
JD candidate ’24, Michigan State University College of Law

What was your experience with the Pathway to Law Workshop?
Overall, Pathway to Law is an amazing experience that provides valuable advice to Native students on how to prepare and approach the law school application cycle. Additionally, the law professors, deans and attorneys share their advice on everything from choosing the right law school to helpful tips on ways to succeed in law school, especially during the first year. Moreover, the PTL staff and volunteers are all extremely supportive and encouraging. 

What information did you find most important in the Workshop (i.e. LSAT prep, personal statement building, etc) and why?
I found the LSAT prep and personal statement building the most helpful. The LSAT prep portion introduced me to the actual LSAT and how challenging it can be, as well as the various prep programs that can be very useful in helping to increase my score. The personal statement building guided me on ways to begin my statement that would be useful for the application cycle. During the personal statement building, we received one-on-one feedback on our statement from admissions staff. Even after the workshop, I was fortunate to receive assistance from a law professor who provided me with endless support and feedback on my personal statement and the application process. 

Would you recommend students interested in law to attend the Workshop?
Yes, I would highly recommend students interested in law to attend the workshop, especially Native students. This workshop is such a valuable resource in educating and guiding prospective students on the daunting law school application process.

Do you have any tips for prospective students?
Attend the workshop and see if this is something you would like to pursue. If so, I highly recommend the Pre-Law Summer Institute, which is another amazing program for Native students interested in law school. These two programs are useful resources that are specifically structured to help Native law students succeed in law school and once we all enter the legal field. Remember your reasons for pursuing a law degree and stay motivated in the face of challenges, especially as Native people because we all deserve to be in these spaces.

Native American Pathway to Law Initiative: Student Success Stories

The Native American Pathway to Law team is excited to host a five-day Pathway to Law Workshop from June 5–9 at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law in Berkeley, California. This workshop offers resources, application review, LSAT preparation, financing information and more—all in a non-recruitment environment. We encourage aspiring law students to participate in this free workshop. 

Five law students share their experiences of how the Pathway Way to Law Workshop solidified their decision to go to law school and provided the tools necessary to strengthen their admissions application.

Eldred D. Lesansee, Pathway to Law Workshop ’19
Ashlee Fox, Pathway to Law Workshop ’20
Geoffrey Bacon, Pathway to Law Workshop ’19
Robin Bilagody, Pathway to Law Workshop ’19
Morgan Oakes, Pathway to Law Workshop ’21

Their success ensures that future Native American students can grow up seeing someone who looks like them and embody the power of possibility for the future of Indian Country.

We welcome any aspiring law students to apply at: law.asu.edu/pathwaytolaw

Application deadline is March 15.

Pathway to Law alum: Geoffrey Bacon

Geoffrey Bacon
Denaakk’e Athabaskan, a member of the Native Village of Tanana
Pathway to Law participant ’19
Pre-Law Summer Institute ’20
JD ’23, University of California, Berkeley School of Law

In 2019, the Pathway to Law workshop helped me with my first case: persuade a law school to accept me. The personal feedback I received on my personal statement was priceless. Additionally, PTL demystified the application process, and gave me the confidence to know I had a competitive application even if I did not score a perfect LSAT.  PTL also helped me understand the cost of attending law school.  After experiencing paying student loans, my tip for prospective students is to control expenses where you can.  Coffee from a pot helps you study as well as the $7 latte from the school cafe. Apply for every scholarship for which you are eligible.  But most importantly, remember your family and friends who love and support you. 

Pathway to Law alum: Eldred D. Lesansee

Eldred D. Lesansee
Pueblo tribes of Jemez and Zuni from New Mexico
Pathway to Law participant ’19
Pre-Law Summer Institute ’22
JD candidate ’25, Columbia Law School

What was your experience with the Pathway to Law Workshop?
I really enjoyed my experience with the Pathway to Law Workshop. Today, I continue to keep in touch with the Pathways staff as well as my classmates in the program. This launched my Native American law community, and I am forever grateful.

What information did you find most important in the Workshop (i.e. LSAT prep, personal statement building, etc) and why?
For me, I really appreciated the one-on-one support in building my personal statement. After receiving feedback from law school admissions representatives and numerous drafts, I was able to fine-tune my personal statement that celebrated my cultural heritage and effectively communicated my aspirations in law school. After the Workshop, I was still able to reach out for support.

Would you recommend students interested in law to attend the Workshop?
Yes, most definitely! As the first in my family to attend law school, the Workshop taught me so much when it comes to applying, financing, attending, and graduating law school. I cannot stress more how much support this program offers prospective law students. I also met so many of my current Native classmates in the program.

Do you have any tips for prospective students?
Follow and incorporate your passions in your study of the law. Your passions can be your guiding star when law school and the legal profession may seem like an endless amount of tasks that you need to complete in such a short period of time. Also, please take advantage of all essay opportunities on the application, making each one a chapter in a book that is your law school application. Last, share your love and pride for your Tribal nations. There are not enough Native American law students, and we deserve to take up space and elevate our voices for our home communities.

Pathway to Law alum: Ashlee Fox

Ashlee Fox
Cherokee Nation
Pathway to Law participant ’20
Pre-Law Summer Institute ’22
JD candidate ’25, Yale Law School

What was your experience with the Pathway to Law Workshop?
Like many other Native law students, I knew little about the law school admissions process before I attended the Pathway to Law workshop. The Pathway to Law workshop was an invaluable resource for me when I decided to apply to law school. The mentors, the community, and the information that Pathway to Law provided allowed me to understand the law school application process. Dean Kate Rosier was instrumental in supporting me on my journey to law school—no matter whether I eventually chose to attend law school. I am forever indebted to her for being an encouraging and supportive voice throughout the application process.

What information did you find most important in the Workshop (i.e. LSAT prep, personal statement building, etc) and why?
A: Every aspect of the Workshop was helpful, but I especially appreciated the personal statement building component and the mentorship component. I am grateful for Pathway to Law’s commitment to investing in the next generation of Native attorneys.

Would you recommend students interested in law to attend the Workshop?
Native students should take advantage of the wealth of resources provided by the Pathway to Law workshop. It is a resource we are fortunate to have, made possible by Native lawyers who care about training the next generation to defend tribal sovereignty and strengthen their tribal nations.

Do you have any tips for prospective students?
Take advantage of the mentorship and support Pathway to Law provides not only during the workshop, but beyond.

Harnessing data, elevating Native Vote

Over spring break, the Indian Legal Clinic welcomed Professor Marcy Karin from the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) School of Law, along with her students. Engaging in an enlightening session, the students gained insights into the voting landscape within Indian Country in Arizona. Additionally, they actively contributed to updating voting data presentations tailored to specific tribes in the state. These updated presentations will play a pivotal role in shaping forthcoming initiatives aimed at boosting voter turnout.