JOB: White Mountain Apache Tribal Prosecutor


JOB DESCRIPTION
TRIBAL PROSECUTOR

Under general supervision of the Tribal Attorney, the Prosecutor represents the White Mountain Apache Tribe before the White Mountain Apache Tribal Court on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation.

EXAMPLE OF DUTIES:
Administers the Prosecution Unit for the White Mountain Apache Tribe, including, but not limited to: prosecution of adults and juveniles, statistical record keeping, budget strategy, supervise all prosecution staff including domestic violence staff, serve as Special Assistant U.S. Attorney to prosecute non-Indian misdemeanor violations in federal court. Review complaints prior to filing. Confer with and give advice to Tribal Court on development of general procedural matters. Train and consult with law enforcement agencies including Whiteriver Police Department, BIA, FBI, and U.S. Attorney’s Office. Interview witnesses, victims, experts, and others to prepare for trial and/or resolution of cases. Conduct legal research. Prepare and argue motions before Tribal and Juvenile Court. Initiate investigation of criminal prosecutors from other tribes government agencies, legal services, social services, guidance pretrial hearings with proper defendants and defense attorneys. Negotiate settlements with proper defendants and defense counsel, conduct trials – including examination and cross-examination of witnesses, and argue Tribe’s position for sentencing. Attend staff meetings, law enforcement meetings, judicial meetings, training, law seminars and workshops. Prosecute Class 3 and 4 Game and Fish violations and juvenile dependency actions. Review and recommend modifications to criminal code, juvenile code and criminal procedure. Review law enforcement policies and procedures. Provide training materials to law enforcement agencies. Develop and implement ongoing programs to meet the needs of the criminal justice system. Write grants and perform other duties as directed. This position reports to the Tribal Attorney.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Must have a Law Degree from an ABA accredited law school.
Must be a member in good standing of a state bar association and eligible for Arizona State Bar membership within twelve months of hire.
Criminal litigation experience required and experience in Indian law required.
Three years litigation experience.
Two years supervisory experience in the field of interest of a related field.

Borchardt (’09) Quoted in "The Spectrum’

Nikki Borchardt, Class of 2009 graduate of the College of Law and member of the Paiute Tribe of Utah, recently emceed her tribe’s Queen and Princess Pageant at the Restoration Gathering, according to the story, “Paiute Tribe celebrates Restoration Gathering, commemoration” on thespectrum.com, a Web site managed by The Spectrum newspaper. The Restoration Gathering was a weekend-long celebration commemorating the restoration of the Paiutes as a recognized American Indian tribe. The pageant showcases modern as well as traditional American Indian talents.
Borchardt, the first of her tribe to receive a law degree, is quoted as explaining, “In the 1950’s we lost the right to our land, health services and fiduciary protection, among other things. In 1980, the Federal Restoration Act restored the relationship with the government and we were able to put our land back into trusts and be recognized as a tribe again.”
Borchardt participated in Moot Court competitions at the law school, was awarded the Honorable William C. Canby Jr. Scholarship, earned both a Juris Doctorate and a Certificate in Indian Law, and graduated with pro bono distinction.

Linda Benally receives State Bar Award

Linda Dayish Benally (Class of 2003) received the Hal Israel Community Service Award at the State Bar’s Annual Convention. The Hal Isreal Award which recognizes a young lawyer who gives generously of his or her time and knowledge to the community through Bar-sponsored programs and initiatives. The award is named for Herman Allen “Hal” Israel, whose great mind and generous spirit were inspirational. Benally, a member of the Diné Nation, is an attorney at Pinnacle West Capital Corp., where she practices regulatory and contract law. Her list of service is lengthy: she is on the State Bar of Arizona’s Diversity Task Force, served on the Bar Leadership Institute’s inaugural Board of Directors/Selection Panel, is a founding member and board member of the Native American Bar Association of Arizona, is on the board of the Phoenix Indian Center and the National Native American Bar Association and also gives her time to several other organizations.

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