Pathway to Law

Online Sessions

6-weeks | Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday | 90-minutes

In its seventh year, the Native American Pathway to Law, formerly known as the Pipeline to Law, is proud to host online sessions June 8-16 in lieu of the prior workshop. These sessions offer advice and guidance for those interested in pursuing a legal education to help applicants navigate all the tests, applications and funding, and ease some of the pressure.

In her recent interview with Native News Online, Kate Rosier, ILP director and assistant dean of institutional progress, said: “We basically act like aunties and uncles, helping people figure out what they need, and what they want from a law school.” The article, “Pathway to Law Initiative Offers ‘Auntie’ Mentorship to Native Kids,” is a great capture of the intent of the initiative. In an effort to lessen confusion and redirect the focus of this initiative, the name was changed to Pathway to Law.

We invite future law students to join our qualified presenters and student speakers to learn from experts on how to get into law school.

Applications are due by Monday, May 3.

If you know any of any students interested, have them apply at: law.asu.edu/pathwaytolaw.

 

Download the PDF flyer.

2021 Pipeline to Law: Online Sessions

The Native American Pipeline to Law Pre-Law team will be hosting Online Sessions this summer. These sessions will help students successfully navigate the law school application process. It doesn’t matter which school you are coming from and which school you choose, we want to help you get there.

  • Develop an effective application, resume, and personal statement
  • Explore law school funding options
  • Receive test prep tips for the LSAT
  • Hear from former and current American Indian law students

Apply by May 3. Spots fill up fast!

Submit your application at: law.asu.edu/pipelinetolaw

Progress, Power, Purpose: Stacy Leeds

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on Native women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. Newest to the ILP Family, Indian law scholar Stacy Leeds brings her extraordinary experiences and ideas to shape the future: first Indigenous woman to lead a law school, Dean Emeritus of the University of Arkansas School of Law, first woman to serve as a Justice on the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court. She is currently a Muscogee (Creek) Nation district court judge and an appellate court judge for Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation. Having paved the way for Native women in different areas, why not consult with this fierce Oklahoma Cherokee woman? Amid a global crisis, this visionary created her blog—IndigenousWell—as a platform of much-needed inclusion and to propel Indigenous women professionals and the balance work of health and wellness.

Q: What does your current position entail?
A: Teaching, writing, helping to advance the mission of the Law School and the ILP

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work?
A: Indian law has always been an interest, but I never would have predicted the many directions my work would take

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area?
A: Always be respectful and supportive of others. Never underestimate the value in your reputation and your network.

Q: What is your proudest career moment?
A: It’s the many moments when former students exceed their own expectations. It is very powerful to witness a big change in someone’s life trajectory and know you played an important role in that.

Q: Is there anything you’ve learned after graduating law school that you wished you learned in class?
A: The complexity of what it takes to be a really great advocate. The strategy, the big picture, the importance of knowing when to be bold and when to be reserved. Law school is a great start, but there are many things that come with experience and maturity.

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career?
A: Critical thinking skills coupled with the ability to communicate. It’s why law school graduates will always have the benefit of diverse career opportunities.

Q: Who are three Native American women law professionals and/or advocates who should be on our radar right now?

  • From Indian law scholars: Professor Maggie Blackhawk (Fond Du Lac Ojibwe) at Penn State Law
  • From Federal Indian Country Crime Prosecutors: Courtney Jordan (Cherokee)
  • From Tribal Governance Roles: ILP grad Doreen McPaul (Navajo)

Q: You are a Native American woman making history and have been the “first” in prominent areas throughout your career—first Native American woman to serve as a Law School dean, first woman justice for the Cherokee Nation’s Supreme Court—Did you ever feel like the lone Native American voice in the room? How did you overcome those adversities? For that girl/woman who is finding her rhythm and trying to carve out a space to thrive, what advice would you give her?
A: I have often been the only woman and the only Native American voice on certain issues and inside certain physical spaces, but I have rarely felt “alone” in those moments. There’s a big difference in feeling lonely (wishing you had peers around you) and being alone (separated without a connection to others). I am always connected to Indigenous issues and Indigenous people and those connections strengthen me. That being said, many of us will find ourselves in roles and circumstances where we are the perceived “voice” representing others. It’s a delicate balance to maximize the power and duty in that moment while simultaneously educating others on the diversity of viewpoints across Indian country. At the end of the day, always try to be your authentic self and don’t compromise your values. There will always be hard days and difficult situations, but in totality, look for opportunities where the positive energy far exceeds the negative energy. I have learned that when I prioritize my own mental, physical and spiritual health, I am also at the top of my game professionally, including being a better advocate for others.

Review Stacy’s publications:

  • Two draft co-authored articles published in the SSRN, “A Wealth of Sovereign Choices: Tax Implications of McGirt v. Oklahoma and the Promise of Tribal Economic Development” and “A Familiar Crossroads: McGirt v. Oklahoma and the Future of the Federal Indian Law Canon.” Please email any feedback.
  • Interviewed by Creative Native podcast about the launch of her blog, IndigenousWell and how athletics in native youth can positively impact their professional lives as leaders. 
  • Her latest tribute to Congresswoman Deb Haaland in this riveting piece, “Picking up broken glass + broken hearts.”
  • More of her amazing work on her website StacyLeeds.com.

Stay tuned for our next Progress, Power, Purpose series.

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Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

“Cultural Misappropriation” – Professor Reed 3/31

Professor Trevor Reed is giving a presentation on Wednesday, March 31 at 5:30-7:30pm EST for Intellectual Property Law Association on “Cultural Misappropriation.”

Register for free to join.

About the program: What is cultural misappropriation and why does it matter? Tune in for a conversation between legal experts and activists covering Copyright and Trademark issues of cultural misappropriation such as the Washington pro football team (Harjo v. Pro Football and its relationship with Matal v. Tam), fashion (Urban Outfitters v. Navajo), photography and music on reservations, and traditional knowledge labeling

Progress, Power, Purpose: Judith Dworkin

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on Native women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. As an ASU Law alum who clerked for Judge William C. Canby, Jr., of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and a founding faculty member of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and the Indian Legal Program, it was for a greater purpose that she become a longtime Indian legal defender and a respected member of the ILP Advisory Council. Powerfully positioned at one of Arizona’s prestigious law firms and leading its Indian Law and Tribal Relations sector, she was recently named as one of the The Best Lawyers in America

Q: What does your current position entail?
A: I recently stepped down as the managing partner of a 35 person law firm. I am an equity shareholder and the head of the Indian law practice area. I currently supervise two Native American lawyers and I represent various tribes, tribal districts/chapters and tribal enterprises in both transactional and litigation work.

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work?
A: After I received a Ph.D. I taught water resources management at two research universities and then left to obtain a law degree. I have been interested in this practice area since law school.

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area?
A: My advice for any woman is to work hard, be prepared to do whatever is necessary to get the job done. You will be noticed as someone that senior lawyers and clients can rely on. In addition, learn what work style the senior lawyer has and be available.

Q: What is your proudest career moment?
A: Probably one of the most fulfilling was ensuring that DNA People’s Legal Services didn’t fail because of the failures of the CEO and the CFO. Through hard work, lots of overtime and making difficult decisions, we managed to keep the doors open for this Legal Services organization. As a result I was awarded the Foundation for Justice Award.

Q: Is there anything you’ve learned after graduating law school that you wished you learned in class?
A: It’s been a long time since I was in law school. The social media stuff wasn’t around and I would like to do a better job at that.

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career?
A: How to read cases and summarize the decisions.

Q: Who are three Native American women law professionals and/or advocates who should be on our radar right now?
A: Patty Ferguson, Candace French (’17) , and Hilary Tompkins.

Review Judy’s publications:

Continue to Progress, Power, Purpose series.

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Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

Progress, Power, Purpose: Gloria Kindig (’89)

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on Native women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. ILP Family started when a small handful of Native law students at ASU wanted to change the narrative at the time—for a university in a state with a large Native American population, there were only a few Native American students attending ASU Law. The focus on expanding opportunities was vital for these few Native law students. They became the representation and changemakers who drafted the proposal, formed a committee and gained the support of law professors and then Dean Paul Bender to establish the ILP. Gloria Kindig with her classmate LynDee Wells (’89) are the determined women whose thoughtful vision led to the creation of the Indian Legal Program and its 32 year legacy. “The two of us combined were a force that would not be denied,” Gloria candidly wrote as she recounted the formation of ILP for our 30th anniversary in 2018. 

Q: What does your current position entail?: 
A: Well, since I’m totally retired these days, my time is my own.  I gave up all my visiting Judicial positions in 2019.  Just in time to be part of the social distancing, stay at home crowd of 2020.

On a serious side, giving up my judicial career and leaving the legal field behind has been interesting.  In some ways it felt like I was wasting my legal education.  But, on the other hand, I firmly believe that at some point everyone needs to step to the side.  If we don’t, then where will the up and coming women find opportunities?  They deserve the opportunity to shine.

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work?
A: The short answer is no.  Prior to going to law school I had a career as a Mining Engineer up in Wyoming, with a bit of farming on the side.  Should I mention that I was one of the first female Mining Engineers and to my knowledge, the first Native American Mining Engineer back then?  I must admit that it was interesting, if hard, to be standing alone in a career field that needed a bit of diversity.   But times were changing and the mining industry was suffering a major downturn, a good time for a change.

Should it be Law school or Veterinary school?  A hard choice, but Law school it was.  A Native student at ASU picked up the phone and convinced me that ASU Law School was the place for me.  Given my prior career I thought that a practice in water law, mineral law, or mining law would be a good fit.  But life has a way of changing things.  A summer position at a firm that specialized in mining and water law convinced me that I needed a new direction.

I graduated without a clear direction and ended up taking a Deputy Prosecutor position in Navajo County.  Concluding, after a few years, that I was being underpaid, I asked for an increase.  The County Prosecutor denied my requested, but stated I could present my request, on my own, to the Board of Supervisors.  The Board of Supervisors heard my request, but without the support of the County Prosecutor it was denied.  Being a firm believer in equal pay for equal work it was time to move on.

While working as an Associate General Counsel for the Hopi Tribe I was offered the position of Chief Judge for the Hopi Tribal Court, the beginning of my Judicial Career.  During this time there was some discussion in the County about changing the way Judges were elected, changing from at-large elections to district elections.  Finding out that no Native American woman had ever tried to be elected to the Navajo County Superior Court Bench inspired me to give it a try.  I soon found myself on the Superior Court Bench.

After eight years on the Bench I lost my reelection bid and had to find a new career.  I became a visiting Judge in a number of Tribal Courts as well as a Judge ProTem in Apache County Superior Court, until I fully retired in 2019.

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area?
A: Whether a person becomes a Tribal Judge, a State Court Judge, or a Federal Court Judge they must always remember to put all their personal bias aside when they put their Judicial robes on.  They should also remember to give each individual and case their full attention.  Yes, it might be the eighth, tenth, or more divorce case you, as a Judge, are hearing that day, but it is the only divorce case the individuals are involved in at the moment.  The individuals are important, the case is important and they deserve your full attention.

I would also suggest that they learn the art of truly listening.  Yes, listening is an art and takes practice.

Finally I would suggest that they study as many different areas of the law as they can in law school, the cases a judge hears, especial a Tribal or State Judge, are diverse and can cover so many different areas of the law.

Q: What is your proudest career moment?
A: I must say that my proudest moment happened when I was still a student at ASU.  It was the day the ASU Faculty approved the Indian Legal Program.  When I joined the ASU Law school student body in 1986 there was not an Indian Legal Program.  Just a class or two titled “Indian Law,” this in a state with such a large Native American Land base and population.  A fellow Native American student and I found this unacceptable.  Working with the Dean and some faculty members the Indian Legal Program was drafted, accepted and implemented in the course of two years.

My second proudest moment in my legal career came when I was able to defy all odds and win an at-large election to the Navajo County Superior Court bench.

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career?
A: Remember that I was in law school before there was an ILP, before there was much coverage of Indian Law as it related and relates to all the major areas of law.  It was also a time when there were very few Native American law students at ASU. 

Not always being a welcomed student taught me to pay attention at all times, to be prepared at all times, to control my feelings at all times. And rather than react with anger, turn negative words and experiences into opportunities to teach others or at least show them the other side of the coin. Good training for a Judge, be attentive, listen, don’t display bias, don’t react to the outbursts of others.

Q: Who are three Native American women law professionals and/or advocates who should be on our radar right now?
A: I don’t really know of any up and comers, my failing not theirs. I have been out of the ‘loop’ for a long time now. But I’m sure that all the many ILP women are people to watch. They will surely do great things in their careers. Be it a legal career or a career in which their ILP experience and life experience can make a difference and improve the lives of others.

Q: In your career, did you ever feel like the lone Native American voice in the room?  How did you overcome those adversities?  For that girl/woman who is finding her rhythm and trying to carve out a space to thrive, what advice would you give her?
A: In both of my careers not only have I felt that I was the lone Native American and lone female voice in the room, I was in fact the lone Native American and female in the room. 

The key was not viewing it as an adversity. Viewing something as adversities results in the desire to overcome or fight the problem. I always found that I might have to voice my opinion time and time again, but if I refused to react in haste and anger, sooner or later, I could usually wear the others down. One also needs to be willing to draw that line in the sand and if others cross it, one needs to not only be willing to get up and walk out or away, but actually get up and walk away.  Worked for me, but also resulted in a few career changes, which worked out for the better in the long run. 

My advice may seem strange and frankly, I never realized that I was doing it until a friend, coworker pointed it out.  But people need to learn to carry their “community” within themselves. If you don’t, you face the risk of doing things to please others, to impress others, to let others disrupt the rhythm of your life and force you into the box they think you belong in.

Stay tuned for our next Progress, Power, Purpose series.

________

Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

Progress, Power, Purpose: Helen Burtis (’07)

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. Another wise woman who has been instrumental to the Indian Legal Program, Faculty Associate at ASU Law and ILP alum Helen Burtis is expanding the ILP vision. Community partnerships and preparing student attorneys are important to the Indian Legal Clinic and Helen works to harness the civic power of the Indian Wills Clinic. Despite the global pandemic crisis, the Indian Wills Clinic continued its service and held virtual sessions working with tribal members to discuss estate planning needs for the Pechanga Wills Clinic last semester and Quechan Wills Clinic just last week.  

Q: What does your position entail?
A: As a Faculty Associate, I teach various Indian law classes and do some program work, including organizing the bi-annual Tribal Court Trial Skills College and also creating new on-line Indian Law courses.

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work?
A:
The law is a second career for me. I spent the first half of my professional life working in the financial services sector, predominantly as an executive for a Fortune 500 insurance carrier. I decided to go into the law because I didn’t want to work my entire life in only one field plus I found legal work, especially Indian law, very interesting.

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area?
A: As you’re figuring out what you want to do with your career, try not to exaggerate in your mind the importance of any one decision. There are only a few decision in life that take you down a path you can’t later deviate from. If you find something you’re interested in, give it a try. If it turns out to be your dream job, fantastic! If your interest later turns in another direction, you can always pursue that new avenue.

Q: What is your proudest career moment?
A: My proudest moments are when I see ILP students in action, such as Indian Legal Clinic student attorneys drafting wills for Native American landowners. What I feel is a special joy from seeing them reaching their potential in a way that benefits individual tribal citizens and tribal communities.  

Q: Is there anything you’ve learned after graduating that you wished you learned in class?
A: My professors at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and the ILP really did great jobs of preparing me to practice. My time in the Indian Legal Clinic and also the two week summer-session Intensive Writing course taught at that time were especially helpful.

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career?
A: One of the most valuable lessor I learned was that fully understanding the other party’s position is a great way to be a better advocate for your client. One of my courses in law school was taught by a professor who had represented positions adverse to Indian County many times. Learning the law from their perspective, which was really from the “state’s” perspective, greatly advanced my understanding of why courts often decided cases against tribal interests and also how to create arguments to overcome those state-centered positions.

Q: What is your advice for current students?
A: If things seem bad in the moment, don’t despair and don’t give up. Over the span of a lifetime, bumps in the road will usually even out.

Q: Favorite law school memory.
A: When I was a student attorney in the Indian Legal Clinic, one of my clients won his motion to dismiss for lack of evidence. I was in class when we received the court’s order dismissing the charges against the client with prejudice, so the Clinic’s paralegal called him right away to give him the good news. He said he wanted me to call him when I got out of class because he would believe it when he heard it directly from his attorney. That made me feel legit.  

Continue to Progress, Power, Purpose series.

________

Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

Celebrating Women’s History Month: Progress, Power, Purpose

Life in a pandemic has not been easy for any of us but we remain resilient and stand strong. While political changes are shifting with the new Biden-Harris Administration, we recognize history in the making. Congresswoman Deb Haaland is front and center as a reminder of women in their power. In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the Indian Legal Program to shed light on women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. Starting with ILP’s powerhouse lady leads, Executive Director Kate Rosier who was recently appointed as Assistant Dean of Institutional Progress at ASU Law and Faculty Director and Indian Legal Clinic Director Patty Ferguson-Bohnee.

In spite of these tumultuous times, ILP’s lady leads have not skipped a beat. In fact, they have greatly expanded and transformed the digital media scene from offering free CLE virtual events (McGirt webinar is still ASU Law’s largest webinar attended) to increased collaborative partnerships. Since the law school reopened its doors to the administration and began offering hybrid courses in August 2020, these lady leads are in their offices every week with their doors open to current and prospective students, and teaching their respective classes. All in the name of good service. 

As a program led by Native women, we want to celebrate our women who are serving their communities, holding seats at the tables of governance, strategizing to secure victories, blazing trails and setting a tone for the generation of Native women to follow. 

Read their stories in the Progress, Power, Purpose series:

  • Kate Rosier, Director and Assistant Dean of Institutional Progress
  • Patty Ferguson-Bohnee, Faculty Director & ILC Director
  • Ann Marie Bledsoe Downes (’94), Professor of Practice and Indian Gaming & Tribal Self-Governance Programs Director
  • Stacy Leeds, Foundation Professor of Law and Leadership
  • Honorable Diane Humetewa (’93), Professor of Practice
  • Helen Burtis (’07), Faculty Associate
  • Breann Swann Nu’uhiwa (’09), Faculty Associate
  • Torey Dolan (’19), Native Vote Fellow
  • Jennifer Giff (’95), Advisory Council
  • April Olson (’06), Advisory Council
  • Nikki Borchardt Campbell (’09), Advisory Council
  • Judith Dworkin (ASU Law ’86),  Advisory Council
  • Maria Dadgar, Advisory Council
  • Claudeen Bates Arthur (’74)
  • Gloria Kindig (’89)
  • Diane Enos (’92)
  • Debra Gee (’94)
  • Doreen Nanibaa McPaul (’01)
  • Lydelle Davies (’02)
  • Diandra Benally (’05)

Stay tuned for more updates to celebrate Women’s History Month.

Note: Photo cover of Kate and Patty were photographed separately with full safety measures and edited post-production.

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Content creator & photo credit: Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law

Progress, Power, Purpose: Patty Ferguson-Bohnee

Women's History Month

In celebrating “Women’s History Month,” we turned to some of the women of the ILP to shed light on Native women legal professionals and advocates in this Progress, Power, Purpose series. Indian Legal Program Faculty Director, Indian Legal Clinic Director and Professor of Law at ASU Law Patty Ferguson-Bohnee is of the Pointe-au-Chien tribe from Louisiana. In addition to teaching, this formidable force is most known for her continued work on the Arizona Native Vote Election Protection Project, which did Indian Country a great service in the 2020 presidential election, moving closer to a democracy that honors and values Native voters. While the pandemic was not an ideal circumstance, Native Vote took to digital media by storm with interviews, trainings, presentations, collaborations and most notably, the newly created Polling Locator Tool. Read more in Arizona Native Vote Changemakers.

When she’s not leading the charge in Native Vote, Patty is preparing students in her Indian Legal Clinic and promoting diversity and inclusion.

Q: What does your current position entail?
A:
I serve as the Director of the Indian Legal Clinic and Faculty Director of the Indian Legal Program at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU.  I am so blessed to be able to work with leading scholars and practitioners in Indian law and Tribal law and motivated students who really care about serving Indian Country.  In the Indian Legal Clinic, the students practice under my bar license.  We work on matters in tribal, state, federal, and international forums.  The cases range from probate, family, criminal and civil litigation, voting rights, code drafting, environment, climate, and status clarification of tribes. My goal is that the students learn useful practical skills and develop a passion for service, while also serving unmet needs for Indian Country.

Q: Were you always interested in this kind of work? 
A: I became interested in law when I participated in mock trial in high school.  However, I became interested in Indian law as an undergraduate student.  I was able to take a Federal Indian Law class as a freshman, and I never looked back. 

Q: What advice do you have for Native American women who want to work in this area? 
A: The sky is the limit!  Although Native American women are the most underrepresented group in the legal profession, Native American women are doing phenomenal work.  Keep in touch with your law school classmates and build a community of support.  Join your local Native American Bar Association and the National Native American Bar Association.   

Q: What is your proudest career moment? 
A: Assisting Four Louisiana Tribes in securing state recognition. 

Q: Is there anything you’ve learned after graduating law school that you wished you learned in class? 
A: Many law students do not learn that there are three sovereigns—the state, the feds, and tribes.  While this might not be harmful in some states, in the southwest, it could lead to malpractice.  It also means that as Native lawyers and practitioners of tribal law and Federal Indian law, we are always teaching—the judges, opposing counsel, co-workers, clients, and others.  At ASU, it is great to have Indian law professors teach first year courses so that they can provide this lens in which to analyze the law.  It makes us all better attorneys and advocates.  Everyone should learn Indian law basics because it transcends all areas of law. 

Q: What is the most valuable lesson you learned in the classroom that has helped you in your career? 
A: I took a few practical courses that served me well. One was environmental litigation, which included drafting briefs and an appellate argument.  The other was mediation clinic, which taught me to listen and provided me tools to help resolve disagreements.   

Q: Who are three Native American women law professionals and/or advocates who should be on our radar right now?

  • Hilary Tompkins: a strong Native American woman, a leader, the first Native American to serve as the Solicitor of the Interior, and someone who has remained humble and genuine.  She is expanding her knowledge base and using this an opportunity to rethink and reframe Indian law issues.  She gave a thoughtful and powerful lecture at last year’s annual Canby Lecture, and I appreciated the time she spent with our students.   
  • Deb Haaland: If confirmed, Deb Haaland will be the first Native American ever appointed to a cabinet position.  Her views on climate change are important to the future of Tribal communities, and the whole country.   
  • Doreen McPaul (’01): Doreen has served in numerous positions – academia, private law firms, tribal in-house counsel, counsel to tribal leadership, and now, Attorney General of the Navajo Nation. Through this journey, she has volunteered, served on numerous boards and bar leadership, speaks on numerous panels, and coordinates educational programs about Indian law and tribal law. She is also the president and founding board member of the Tribal In-House Counsel Association – a much needed forum to support tribal in-house attorneys and advocates. 

Review Patty’s publications:

  • Received the American Bar Association’s 2020 Spirit of Excellence award
  • “How the Native American Vote Continues to be Suppressed” article published in the ABA Vol. 45, No. 1: Voting Rights.
  • Co-authored with James Tucker article “Voting During a Pandemic Vote-By-Mail Challenges for Native Voters”
  • “The History of Indian Voting Rights in Arizona: Overcoming Decades of Voter Suppression” SSRN article
  • “The Impacts of Coastal Erosion on Tribal Cultural Heritage” article published in the SSRN.

Continue to Progress, Power, Purpose series.

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Danielle Williams
Program Coordinator, Indian Legal Program, ASU Law